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ANNUAL REPORTS NUMBER OF THE 

WELLESLEY COLLEGE BULLETIN 



WELLESLEY, MASSACHUSETTS 
OCTOBER 15, 1942- 



ANNUAL REPORTS NUMBER OF THE 

WELLESLEY COLLEGE BULLETIN 



OCTOBER 15, 1942. 



Bulletins published seven times a year by Weilesley College, Wellesley, Massachusetts. April, three; 
September, one; October, two; November, one. Entered as second-class matter, February 12, 1912, 
at the Post Office at Boston, Massachusetts, under the Act of July, 1894. Additional entry at 
Concord, N. H. 



Volume 32 Number 2 



CONTENTS 

Report of the President 5 

Report of the Librarian 14 

Appendix: 
Faculty 

Appointment and Tenure Policy 26 

Academic Biography of New Members for 1 942-43 ... 30 

Leaves of Absence in 1 942-43 33 

Changes in Rank in 1942-43 34 

Resignations and Expired Appointments, June, 1942 . . 34 

Publications of the Faculty, 1941-42 36 

Lectures, Concerts, and Art Exhibitions, 1941-42 

Lectures 43 

Sunday Services 46 

Concerts 47 

Art Exhibitions 48 

Conferences 48 

Academic Statistics, 1941-42 49 

Scholarships, 1941-42 53 

Legacies and Gifts, 1941-42 54 

Report of the Treasurer 61 



REPORT OF THE PRESIDENT 

To the Board of Trustees: 

I have the honor to present the report of the year 1941-42, the 
sixty-seventh session of Wellesley College. In an effort to adapt 
it to war economy I propose to make only brief comments about 
the most important events which have occurred during the 
year. 

Personnel of the Board of Trustees 

It was a source of profound regret to all friends of Wellesley 
College to learn of the sudden death on March first of James 
Dean who had been Treasurer of the College since September, 
1928. His service to the College was of immeasurable impor- 
tance to its welfare and he will be sadly missed. 

This year marks the end of the term of service of Margaret 
Elliott Tracy, the senior alumnae trustee. Mrs. Tracy's teach- 
ing experience, combined with her personal wisdom and help- 
fulness, makes her a Board member whom it is hard to lose. 
Since the action of the Alumnae Association precludes the possi- 
bility of reelection, her resignation had to be accepted. 

Mr. Harvey H. Bundy tendered his resignation to the Board 
when he was appointed as special assistant to the Secretary of 
War. This resignation was not accepted and the Board takes 
satisfaction in his continued membership in spite of the fact that 
it has been possible for him to attend meetings only occasion- 
ally. 

It is with satisfaction that the Board received word of the nomi- 
nation by the Alumnae Association of Calma Howe Gilkey of 
the Class of 1915 who was elected to membership at the May 
meeting of the Board. 

The Finance Committee, assisted by Mr. Aldrich, Dr. Fitz, 
and Mr. Forbes, rendered very fine service to the College by 
finding John P. Chase who was elected in April as the Treasurer 



Wellesley College 

of the College. He has already shown himself to be a worthy 
successor to Mr. Dean. 

Personnel of the Faculty and Staff 

Wellesley College was saddened by the death on July 31, 1941, 
of Frances Louise Knapp, the Dean of Freshmen and Chairman 
of the Board of Admission. Her twenty-five years of service had 
endeared her to many generations of students as well as to the 
colleagues who have greatly missed her wise counsel during the 
past year. 

The sudden death of Associate Professor Gordon Boit Wellman 
on March 30, 1942, made the department of Biblical History 
and the rest of the College aware of the loss of a true friend and a 
most helpful colleague. 

Dr. Emilie Jones Barker, the first physician of the College, died 
in California on October 8 at the age of one hundred and one 
years. The generous gift of her former students and friends to a 
furnishing fund for the new infirmary is an interesting tribute to 
the influence which she exerted at the College in her years of 
service to it. 

Four members of the faculty retired at the end of the year: 
Mary Campbell Bliss, Professor of Botany, after a service of 
thirty-nine years; Elisabeth Hodder, Professor of History, after 
thirty-six years; Annie Kimball Tuell, Professor of English Liter- 
ature, after thirty years; and Edith Margaret Smaill, Director of 
Theatre Workshop, after twenty-nine years. Amy Kelly has 
retired as Head of Claflin Hall after eight years, but will continue 
to teach for one year in the department of English Composition. 

The College, and especially the Class of 1945, is indebted to 
Assistant Professor Helen G. Russell for her willingness to revise 
her teaching schedule so that she could be the Acting Dean of 
Freshmen during the past year. Upon her return to a full-time 
appointment to the department of Mathematics, Mrs. Wilma 
Kerby-Miller will become Dean of Freshmen and Chairman of 
the Board of Admission. Mrs. Kerby-Miller is a graduate of 
Rockford College with master's and doctor's degrees from the 
University of Chicago. She has been for three years teaching in 
the departments of English Composition and Literature and is 



President's Report 

welcomed by all her associates as a highly valued member of the 
administration. 

The Mary Whiton Calkins Visiting Professor was Hersch 
Lauterpacht of Cambridge, England, who brought to the de- 
partment of Political Science a superb professional reputation 
which was greatly enhanced in value by his friendliness and per- 
sonal interest in the affairs of the College. When his obligations 
in England called him away at the end of the first semester, it 
was the good fortune of his students and his colleagues to welcome 
for the second semester Hans Kelsen, the distinguished professor 
of international law who was visiting at Harvard. 

Major Events of the Year 

The War. The war is of course the dominant factor in the his- 
tory of this college year as it is dominant in all aspects of national 
life. It has affected the curriculum in the introduction of several 
new courses. A semester course in Electronics in the Physics 
department, a second year in Bacteriology, and a course in Public 
Administration in the department of Political Science were in- 
troduced as a direct response to war needs. In established 
courses there has been constantly modified emphasis. Student 
electives have clearly reflected the war emergency. The de- 
partments of Mathematics, Physics, Spanish, and Sociology have 
had conspicuous increases either this year or for the coming year. 
The department of Chemistry has recently had big gains which 
are well maintained for next year. The shift away from the 
humanities is natural though regrettable, and it is our definite 
intention to maintain the departments of language and literature 
during these years of numerical decline. They must be ready to 
come back into their full strength as soon as war conditions 
permit. 

The extra-curricular activities of the College have definitely 
reflected the war conditions. The College Service Fund dis- 
tributed S7,881 through the War Relief Committee. Special 
courses in first aid, home nursing, canteen cookery, child care, 
vegetable gardening, and typewriting were well attended by 
the students and members of the faculty. The air raid protection 
under the direction of Associate Professor Lawrence Smith, the 



Wellesley College 

chief air raid warden, has been highly efficient and effective. 
The hours of time which have been required by Mr. Smith and 
his deputies have been both numerous and strenuous, and the 
College is indebted to these experts in air raid precautions. Sev- 
eral faculty members and a number of students have been en- 
gaged in confidential work in behalf of various government 
agencies. The report of the Placement Office indicates the 
marked demand for women employees which the war is creating. 
Only two members of the faculty were drawn away for govern- 
ment service during the current year, but three more withdrew 
in June, two to go to Washington and one for military duty 
abroad. 

Twenty-nine undergraduates were married during the aca- 
demic year, and nine of them returned to the dormitories, a direct 
reflection of war conditions. It is reported by the Dean of Stu- 
dents that special arrangements were made for the examination 
schedules of students whose marriage dates had to be planned to 
meet the furloughs of their husbands-to-be. 

Domestic problems of another sort are reported by the Dean of 
Residence: 

"The college houses have run smoothly this year in spite of difficulties 
in completing staffs and in the cost of food. The observance of meatless 
days has been carried out without adverse comment. The dietitians 
have been very successful in providing acceptable new dishes, less ex- 
pensive than those of the past, and there is general agreement that the 
college table has been enjoyed quite as much as in previous years. 

"It was to be expected that our maids would be tempted into industry 
by high wages, but, on the whole, we have found our staffs appreciative 
of the conditions we offer for work and for living. Some houses have 
found it necessary to use students for waiting in the dining-room and for 
bell duty. The students have been willing to cooperate in the cleaning 
of their rooms when this was requested for short periods, and have been 
ready to apply for the household tasks for which we have paid them 
thirty or thirty-five cents an hour. It is a satisfaction to report that all 
but four of the twenty houses have their staffs for next year. We plan to 
continue the service as usual as far as possible." 

Mrs. Ewing stresses other indirect effects of war: 
"The College Government Association has functioned effectively, 

8 



President's Report 

especially in relation to new responsibilities in connection with the war. 
The relief work has been increased in every department and large classes 
have been carried on. Dances have also been held for various groups of 
men in the service and groups of students have assisted in entertaining in 
the convalescent ward of the hospital at Camp Devens. 

"A continued effort was made this year to enlist the interest of the 
student body in the administration of College Government. The pat- 
ronage of the Senate 'gallery' has indicated a generous response and 
warm interest has been shown in several discussions. Plans are under 
way for the development of more recreation on campus next year when 
transportation to Boston and Cambridge will present new problems. 

"... I would like to record a marked increase in chapel attendance 
during most of this year, and an increased seriousness in the student 
addresses on Thursdays. The Little Chapel has been used every Thurs- 
day for a Communion Service at seven o'clock; every afternoon for a 
short service at quarter before six, and once a week for a service of half 
an hour at quarter after five." 

The Calendar. The fuel oil shortage created by the war pre- 
cipitated very serious discussions about the calendar of the aca- 
demic year. It was originally proposed that the College might 
stay in session during the summer with only a brief vacation in 
the winter, but in the light of advice from faculty members, un- 
dergraduates, parents, and the heads of schools across the country 
it was finally decided to start the college year on the 27th of Au- 
gust and to complete the work of the first semester by December 
19. The College will be on vacation until the first of February, 
providing a six-week winter holiday. It is the hope of the makers 
of this plan that, in addition to saving fifty or seventy-five thou- 
sand gallons of oil and indicating the willingness of the College to 
adjust itself to the war demands, the extended vacation will pro- 
vide an opportunity for students to supplement their theoretic 
training with practical experience in their home communities. 

The Dean of Students reports that "the Administrative Board 
reviewed the programs of all students who plan to accelerate their 
college course, and granted a number of special permissions for 
late returns to college in August. These latter dispensations 
were given to students who had incurred obligations for summer 
positions and to those who had legitimate reasons for attending 
long summer school sessions." 



Wellesley College 

Entrance Examinations. With the declaration of war, Harvard, 
Yale, and Princeton Universities declared their intention of ad- 
mitting students to college without the June comprehensive ex- 
aminations of the College Entrance Examination Board. The 
withdrawal of so many candidates bade fair to distort the results 
of the examination scores for the other applicants, and at a meet- 
ing during the Christmas vacation representatives of the women's 
colleges who send the largest number of candidates to the College 
Board examinations decided to follow the example of the three 
men's universities. All applicants for Wellesley admission in the 
fall of 1942 were asked to take the April achievement tests and 
these were required of those applicants who would otherwise 
have taken the June examinations. It was possible to consider 
the credentials and to select the Class of 1946 in May. At the 
time of writing, the entering class already numbers over four 
hundred and there are a considerable number of students who 
have been admitted from whom replies have not yet been received. 

Dean Wilson acted as Chairman of the Board of Admission, in 
addition to carrying her other responsibilities. Her report in- 
cludes the following observation: "The tentative admission of 
the Class of 1946 in May meant that scholarship awards to the 
entering class were made at the same time. From alumnae 
clubs as well as from the families of the students have come en- 
thusiastic appreciation of the opportunity thus afforded for 
making plans at this early date." 

Refugee Scholarships. As Chairman of the Scholarship Com- 
mittee, Miss Wilson writes: "A review of the situation of the stu- 
dents on refugee scholarships led to the conclusion that it would 
be unwise to continue these awards after students now in college 
had graduated. One of these scholarships became available by 
the graduation of a fine German girl who made a splendid record. 
Her scholarship was assigned to a member of the Class of 1 944, 
also a German refugee, who had proved herself to be a good stu- 
dent and a responsible college citizen. The recommendation 
was made to the Trustees and accepted by them that after two 
recipients of refugee scholarships receive their degrees in June 
1943, their scholarships be made available for use of Latin 
American students." 

10 



PREsroENT's Report 

Departmental Honors. The major academic innovation of the 
year was the establishment of a new form of departmental hon- 
ors, as reported by the Dean of Instruction: 

"The old plan of awarding Departmental Honors on the basis of 
grades in courses in the major subject and in the general examination 
has been withdrawn. In the new plan a student must become a candi- 
date for Departmental Honors; she must carry supplementary work in 
the summer following her junior year and throughout her senior year; 
at the end she must take the general examination and an oral examina- 
tion. Honors will be awarded to candidates who show distinction in 
the work in the major department in the last three semesters of the 
college course and also in the two examinations (the general and the 
oral). The purpose of the new plan is to provide incentive for full use of 
their powers for those able students who do not wish to take Honors in a 
Special Field but prefer, for one reason or another, to carry a normal 
program of four courses in the senior year." 

The Tenure Report. The Academic Council conferred at great 
length on matters of appointment and tenure which grew out of 
reports by the American Association of University Professors 
and the Association of American Colleges. The recommenda- 
tions as finally adopted and approved by the Board of Trustees 
appear in the appendix to this report. 

The Bonus. A year ago it was announced that during the 
fiscal year 1942-43 salaries would be paid on a twelve-month 
basis instead of in ten installments as has been customary. 
This year, therefore, marks the end of the traditional method of 
payment. This shift means that in October, 1 942, faculty mem- 
bers who have been accustomed to receiving two-tenths of their 
year's salaries will receive only one-twelfth. The action of the 
trustees in providing a bonus of four percent of all salaries, 
payable June 30, seems, therefore, unusually timely. This is a 
direct war measure designed to relieve the financial burden of 
members of the faculty and staff" whose salaries have not been in- 
creased in proportion to the cost of living and increased taxation. 
It follows action which was taken earlier in the winter to provide 
a weekly bonus for members of the domestic and operating staffs. 

The Infirmary. The major building event in the academic year 
1 941-42 was the completion of the new infirmary. The opening 

11 



Wellesley College 

was celebrated by simple dedicatory exercises in the solarium on 
Sunday, February 8, and the first patients were admitted at the 
opening of the second semester. It has been an eminently satis- 
factory addition to the equipment and, since it represents the 
gifts of a large number of friends of the College, it has both per- 
sonal and practical value. 

Wellesley College Associates. On the recommendation of the 
Endowment Committee, the Board of Trustees approved the 
organization of the Wellesley College Associates, a group of men 
and women with or without an immediate Wellesley connection 
who believe in its work enough to contribute an annual gift of 
one hundred dollars to be used as so-called "living endowment." 

Mayling Soong Foundation. June, 1942, marked the twenty- 
fifth anniversary of the graduation from Wellesley College of 
Mayling Soong Chiang (Madame Chiang Kai-shek). During 
the winter a committee was appointed by the President of the 
College to consider adequate ways to commemorate this event. 
The committee consisted of Dorothy Bridgman Atkinson (Chair- 
man), Grace Ballard Hynds, Emma Mills, Elizabeth Luce Moore, 
Mai-mai Sze, Hetty S. Wheeler, and Sophie C. Hart. On the 
recommendation of that committee, the Trustees voted to break 
their established precedent and to offer the honorary degree of 
Doctor of Laws to Madame Chiang who was presented for the 
degree in the words of Dean Whiting: 

"For years Madame Chiang has led her people with courage, re- 
sourcefulness, and wisdom, in peace and in war. Even during the 
struggle, she has labored, with a humane spirit, to build a new China 
firmly founded upon the ancient virtues of the Chinese people. Her 
words and her deeds have lighted a way for men of good will in all 
lands." 

On Alumnae Day, June 13, Madame Chiang broadcast a 
message from Chungking to her fellow alumnae assembled in 
Alumnae Hall and in various places across the country. They 
and their friends raised a gift of some fourteen thousand dollars 
to be sent to her. 

In addition to this personal recognition, friends of Madame 
Chiang contributed gifts and pledges amounting to S21,388 to 
establish the Mayling Soong Foundation which it is hoped will 

12 



President's Report 

grow through the years to be used for the cultivation at Wellesley 
College of interest in China and the East. It is the intention of 
the trustees and administration to use the income from the fund 
to strengthen the courses in various departments which concern 
the Far East and to bring to the campus distinguished speakers, 
books, artists, exhibits, to interpret China and the other nations 
of the East to American college students. As the Foundation in- 
creases in size and as world conditions permit, it is our hope to use 
it for the establishment of exchange scholarships, that young 
women from the West may have the opportunity to join the young 
women from the East in study at home and abroad. It is, thus, 
hoped that the Foundation named in her honor may perpetuate 
the international understanding which Madame Chiang has done 
much to establish. It was agreed by the trustees and the Execu- 
tive Board of the Alumnae Association that the Mary Whiton 
Calkins Professorship might be used during the year 1 942-43 for 
the purpose as outlined in connection with the Foundation. The 
plans for the use of this fund include the appointment of George 
Rowley, Associate Professor at Princeton University, as Mary 
Whiton Calkins Lecturer in Art. Plans are being made for an 
institute in the first semester to consider the political and social 
problems of China and the East and for another in the second 
semester to be concerned especially with the philosophy and art 
of that part of the world. The funds will further be used for 
additions to library equipment and for an unusual art exhibit. 

The year 1941-42 has been characterized by all the foregoing 
special events. The most important thing about it, however, 
has been the fact that in the presence of a world-shaking crisis 
Wellesley has continued to be a liberal arts college in which 
young women have learned to think straight and to act co- 
operatively and to will great things for themselves and their na- 
tion. They have been strengthened in this in the continuing 
support of an incredibly generous and loyal group of alumnae 
whose gifts to the College have been large in money and larger in 
interest and in intelligent concern. 

Respectfully submitted, 

T o/^ tr^An, Mildred H. McAfee, President. 

June 30, 1942. 

13 



REPORT OF THE LIBRARIAN 

To the President of Wellesley College: 

I have the honor to present the report of the College Library 
for the year ending June 30, 1942. 

The subject chosen for emphasis in the annual report of the 
year just past is concerned with the resources for scholarship 
found in the Main Library, the educational ideals which have 
brought them here, and the use to which they are put. In order 
to do even partial justice to the many aspects of this side of the 
work, accounts of other events of the year and of the fine use made 
of departmental libraries have been reduced to statistical ap- 
pendices on file in the President's office. 

The meat of the text of the report has been taken from records 
kept by Lilla Weed, '02, Associate Librarian and Curator of the 
English Poetry Collection. Miss Weed is one of those rare libra- 
rians who have delighted to devote practically all of their pro- 
fessional lives to one institution, in this case to her Alma Mater. 
While many parts of the Library have benefited by her care, it is 
in behalf of rare books and materials for research that she has 
been student, lover, and servant. If these rare books in the 
Wellesley College Library had tongues, they would rise up and 
call blessed the years in which they have owed so much to her 
curatorship. This report, then, while not written by Miss Weed, 
is, nevertheless, her report. 

Resources for Scholarship in the Library 

Origin and development. Historically, the Wellesley College 
Library derives from its Founder, Henry Fowle Durant, who 
opened it to the beginning students of the new college in Novem- 
ber, 1875, when it was already equipped with more than 8,000 
volumes. These books came from Mr. Durant's own library, 
the catalogue of which is preserved in a manuscript volume of 
1,135 folios. What amazing works they were to come from the 
library of a private individual ! Not one encyclopedia or two, 
but various editions, and from diff"erent countries for comparison; 

14 



Report of the Librarian 

philology, not forgetting Hebrew; great reference sets such as 
Michaud's Biographie Universelle; contemporary science, with a 
copy of On the Origin of Species printed only one year after its first 
publication; collected editions and long runs of French classical 
authors and Pre-Shakespearean English dramatists; the great 
Muratori's Annali d' Italia — all these and many more like them 
were included in the Founder's gift. Here was no collection of 
easy books for immature minds, but a working library already of 
stalwart proportions. Therefore, it is not surprising that when 
the first class of students, moved by gratitude for Mr. Durant's 
gift, collected eight hundred dollars to be spent for the new 
Library the fund was immediately put into complete sets of schol- 
arly journals and continuations, the collecting of which today 
remains the despair of younger libraries that have arrived late 
in the market for such purchases. 

For the future development of the Library, it is very important 
to notice how its original design was part of Mr. Durant's educa- 
tional philosophy — a philosophy still formative at Wellesley. 
He believed in a large, rich book collection, "It (the Library) has 
shelf room for one hundred and twenty thousand volumes — 
nearly as many as the library at Harvard contains." In spite of 
his provisions for quantity in the Library, it was quality he sought 
in the books that were to be put to work for students and actively 
used by them. Rote learning and text book memorizing were 
alike anathema to Mr. Durant and his faculty shared his preju- 
dice against these two educational sins against the Holy Ghost. 

"Close, systematic observation, at first hand, he decided, was 
the one and only way to study science. Mathematics was the 
means through which to develop original thinking and reasoning 
powers of the students; hence there should be no parrot-like 
repetitions of demonstrable propositions. Literature could not, 
he knew, be administered in compressed tabloids, however ad- 
mirable, but must be sought for and found at its original sources." 
(Kingsley, F. M. The Life of Henry Fowle Durant, p. 191-92.) In 
one of the letters written by Alice Freeman Palmer when she 
was on her way to begin her work at Wellesley she said: "But I go 
soon to Wellesley because I must see what books are in the library 
there. I have to arrange my topics and make my references, as 

15 



Wellesley College 

the classes use no text books." Amusingly enough, the writer's 
eye encountered this statement on the very day on which she saw 
the seventy-two pages of a current syllabus in history, designed to 
teach incoming freshmen not only the subject matter of the course 
but also how to use many books as aids to learning. 

The friends and associates of Mr. Durant who helped him by 
generous support for the Library are numerous. Without the 
endowments made by such men as Eben N. Horsford and Ed- 
ward N. Kirk the growing book collection would have lacked 
much of the strength it has today. The Bates, Goodspeed, Ham- 
mond, Hazard, Palmer, Plimpton, and other gifts that would 
have delighted the Founder have never failed through the years. 

The mantle of great benefactors of the past has now fallen upon 
a group of ninety-three generous donors who, banded together as 
The Friends of the Wellesley College Library, continue to bring 
to the shelves with unfailing regularity early editions, monumental 
reference sets, and works of supreme importance. In selecting a 
title for Bulletin Number 4, published by the Friends in June, 1942, 
that of Thomas Dekker's The Wonderful I Teare was chosen to typify 
the quality of gifts described in the pages of the bulletin. The 
full tale of these gifts may be read in the appendix to the Presi- 
dent's Report, but in passing it is safe to say that any year is won- 
derful that adds to the resources of a college library first editions of 
Darwin's Origin of Species, Lyell's Principles of Geologp, Mill's On 
Liberty, two Baskervilles (Horace and Virgil), and Pliny's Historia 
Naturalis in the Jenson edition of 1472. 

The portion of the Undesignated Alumnae Gift allocated by 
the President to the Library has for three years given purchasing 
power that has built up the bibliography collection, secured good 
reading editions of the English classics, financed expensive pur- 
chases of sets having inter-departmental interest, and brought 
within reach desiderata as these came up in the secondhand mar- 
ket. Next year, a portion of this grant will make possible the 
purchase of the first published edition of the Depository Catalogue 
of the Library of Congress, a bibliographical tool that will be of 
even greater importance to this Library than are its two great 
predecessors, the General Catalogue of the British Museum, and the 
Catalogue General of the Bibliotheque Nationale. 

16 



Report of the Librarian 

Time fails to describe in detail all of the resources that such 
library support has developed and is developing in the Library, 
but a list of the large special collections available to the student 
will at least indicate that these resources are generous: 

Elbert Collection of books on slavery, secession, and reconstruction; 
Katharine Lee Bates Collection of drama and modern poetry; 
Brooks Room Collection of choice books in good editions; 
Durant Collection of rarer items from the Founder's original gift; 
English Poetry Collection of first and rare editions and association 

copies of English poets from Chaucer to Masefield; 
Historical Collection of Wellesleyana, theses, alumnae and faculty 

publications; 
Plimpton Collection of romances of chivalry and Italian literature, 

chiefly of the fourteenth and fifteenth centuries; 
Ruskin Collection of first editions, rare pamphlets, and biographical 

and critical material. 

The Use of Scholarly Resources in the Library 

Service to faculty and students. The use made of the special col- 
lections in most instances originates from requests made by mem- 
bers of the faculty who wish access to them for personal research, 
or to introduce students to early and rare forms of works the con- 
temporary editions of which are in daily use by classes. To in- 
dividual graduate students the collections have supplied all or 
essential materials for theses of which the following are examples : 

Dwight, C. H. A Study of Giuseppe Baretti as a Precursor of the 

Italian Romanticists, 1935; 
Fisher, A. P. Unpublished Poems of Anne, Countess of VVinchilsea, 

1928; 
Hazeltine, A. I. A Study of William Shenstone and of His Critics, 

1913; 
Merola, G. R. Nuovi Principi di Vita Femminile nell'Opera del 

Boccaccio, 1940; 
Mirante, A. G. Epigoni deH'Ariosto nel Romanzo Cavalleresco, 

1937; 
Oliva, C. D. Federigo Nomi ed il Mimetismo Letterario nel Sei- 

cento, 1942; 
Robinson, Eloise. The Minor Poems of Dr. Joseph Beaumont, 1912; 
Solimene, L. I. Origine e Sviluppo di Rodomonte, Eroe della Poesia 

Cavalleresca Italiana, 1941; 

17 



Wellesley College 

Wright, Marjorie. La Leggenda di Alessandro Magno nel Parsa- 
foresto (trad, del sec. XLV), 1939. 

Upon occasions classes meet in the Treasure Room so that a 
whole group may study books collected in advance to illustrate 
a subject connected with a course. For instance, during the 
past year one professor wished to impress upon her class the im- 
portance of source material and to introduce the class, in one 
meeting, to the sources they would ask for again and again during 
the year. Thirty-one volumes were brought together for the 
purpose and the class made a preliminary examination of the 
volumes in order to use them to good effect later. For a second 
class, the Curator was invited to illustrate the work of early 
scribes as they copied manuscripts in their scriptoria. The prep- 
aration of ink, the colors used in illuminating, and the history of 
the manuscripts that resulted were considered in the presence of 
eighteen original documents, from which the class also learned 
to distinguish uncial, minuscule, and gothic styles of handwriting. 

By no means all of the manuscripts and early editions used in 
this way are documents of the humanities. Science, including 
mathematics, is well represented in the collection, so much so 
that twenty volumes illustrating the history of mathematics were 
assembled for a class in that subject. A jewel among these was 
the Ratdolt Euclid, of 1482, presented to the Library by the Class 
of 1905 in memory of its honorary member, Ellen Fitz Pendleton. 

The Plimpton Collection of something over a thousand vol- 
umes supplies the source material used by the Italian Depart- 
ment for the work of its students. For each of the past three 
years a graduate student in the field has held a Library coopera- 
tive grant carrying an obligation to work six hours a week in the 
Plimpton Room. With her help it has been possible for the 
Italian Department to bring the collection into more intimate 
connection with the teaching program. Six exhibitions ar- 
ranged during the year under Miss Weed's supervision by the 
Italian library fellow were carefully selected and annotated to 
illustrate points for the consideration of classes in the Plimpton 
Room, as follows: 

Fifteenth and sixteenth century editions of Dante's Divina Commedia; 
The development of history from the chroniclers to Guicciardini; 

18 



Report of the Librarian 

Petrarch's works in the vernacular and in Latin; 
Boccaccio the humanist; 
Boccaccio's works in the vernacular; 
Ariosto and his imitators. 

A machine for reading microfilm is also at the disposal of 
students working with special collections. Thus their training in 
research not only involves the handling of rare books and manu- 
scripts at Wellesley but also introduces them to methods of ob- 
taining material from other libraries. These libraries include 
institutions as far away as the British Museum, from which film 
has been secured to supply material not available through inter- 
library loan in this country. 

Service to visitors and correspondents. Of first importance in this 
connection are the requirements of visiting scholars whose re- 
search projects call for examination of source material. Among 
the most pleasant occasions of this kind are those when the schol- 
ars come in person; at other times correspondence must achieve 
the end sought. A sample list taken from Miss Weed's catalogue 
of investigations in progress or completed indicates the scope of 
this work: 

Examination of fifteenth and sixteenth century bindings by a profes- 
sor from the University of Michigan; 

Dexigraphing two hundred and seventeen pages of two fifteenth 
century manuscripts of Boccaccio's Vita di Dante for a definitive 
edition of the work, at the request of Professor Arnaldo Foresti; 

Dexigraphing eighty-eight pages of the manuscript of Boccaccio's 
Amorosa Visione and Caccia di Diana for new editions being pre- 
pared by Professor Vittore Branca, for publication by the R. 
Accademia della Crusca, Florence, Italy; 

Description of an early edition of Petrarch, mailed to a specialist at 
Oberlin; 

Browning material examined by an author as background for writing 
a life of Mrs. Browning for children; 

Examination of the Caroline Maddox Beard gift of early editions of 
cook books, by a lecturer preparing a series of public lectures on a 
related topic; 

Examination of various editions of Orlando Furioso in connection with 
the preparation of a doctoral dissertation by a candidate who 
now holds the Wellesley Horton-Hallowell Fellowship. 

19 



Wellesley College 

This year the Treasure Room had the privilege of being in- 
spected by nine groups of visitors who came by special arrange- 
ment and for a purpose. Among these were groups from the 
Boston-Wellesley Acquaintanceship Plan; the Winchester Welles- 
ley Club, for a special exhibition and tea in the Brooks Room; the 
New England Poetry Society for the closing meeting of the year 
in the Brooks Room, followed by an inspection of rare books and 
manuscripts and an informal reception; the Belmont Woman's 
Club, particularly to see Browning items of much interest to the 
numerous members who were also members of a Browning 
Club. 

Exhibitions. Exhibitions are of two kinds: teaching exhibitions 
and public exhibitions. Teaching exhibitions illustrate a lec- 
ture, or are arranged to facilitate some special investigation made 
by a whole class, or they show documents related to a particular 
teaching project. They are arranged at the request of members 
of the faculty. Public exhibitions are the result of research on 
the part of the Curator, who selects and annotates rare books 
connected with some literary anniversary or public event; or 
they may be set up to illustrate the progress of study and investi- 
gation in a given subject. 

Teaching exhibitions covered a variety of subjects, of which the 
following are illustrations: 

First editions of sixteenth century authors were studied during con- 
ference periods since the class was too large to assemble in the 
Treasure Room at one time; 

Two classes used fifty-four books and periodicals showing a chrono- 
logical development of the essay in outstanding eighteenth and 
nineteenth century periodicals; 

Students were shown the use of source material in biographical writ- 
ing by an arrangement of Bronte items in relation to Bronte 
biographical studies; 

Browning manuscripts and personalia, including Robert Browning's 
letter in which he mentions Wellesley College seven years after 
its founding, were assembled for the use of students in English 
poetry of the nineteenth century; 

Examples of early printing, with special emphasis on their "points," 
were brought together for study by the class in bibliography. 
Quartos, folios, colophons, printers' marks, type faces, and can- 

20 



Report of the Librarian 

eels were selected and grouped to illustrate the evolution of the 
modern book. 

Space is not available for full description of the public exhibi- 
tions. Manuscript catalogues of these, complete with annota- 
tions, are on permanent record in the Librarian's office, where 
they are not only a constant temptation to pride and vainglory 
in the Library, but also to envy of an accomplishment so far re- 
moved from the routine of ordinary administrative work. 

This year the most ambitious of the public exhibitions was 
arranged at Commencement in honor of Madame Chiang Kai- 
shek of the Class of 1917, in celebration of the twenty-fifth anni- 
versary of her graduation from Wellesley College. 

Through the generous kindness of Columbia and Harvard uni- 
versities the Library was enabled to include in the exhibition 
some seventy unusual items lent by the two institutions. Colum- 
bia contributed a collection of works published in Madame 
Chiang's lifetime, arranged and annotated to show the impact of 
the West on the East in the contemporary period. The Harvard 
loan consisted of volumes of Chinese belles-lettres illustrating 
great periods in Chinese literature with characteristic illustrations 
and bindings. 

Additional public exhibitions covered the topics given below: 

October. The development of the poetic inspiration of Keats and 
Coleridge as shown in early editions; 

November. Early editions of W'ordsworth, particularly of Lyrical 
Ballads; William Blake, designer, engraver, illustrator, poet; 

December. Christmas hymns and poems in first editions of the Eng- 
lish poets; 

March, April. William Morris, poet, artist, publisher, socialist, 
designer, manufacturer; 

May. The development of bookbinding from the fifteenth to the 
twentieth century illustrated by original examples; 

May, June. Browning manuscripts, first editions, memorabilia. 

The book and humanistic culture. It is a guiding principle in all 
work with rare materials at Wellesley that they shall be thought 
of, not as museum pieces, but as living literature in forms valuable 
for study and enjoyment. The ways in which books are made; 

21 



Wellesley College 

why type is good or bad; the part that the right kind of paper 
plays in making a book readable; bookbinding as a minor art not 
beyond the powers of average people; the place of the book in the 
development of personal culture; collecting one's own library as 
a delight and as a good investment — all of these offices in behalf of 
books the Library tries to perform more or less incidentally. By 
the contagion of its own enthusiasm it seeks to open to students 
the great resources for enjoyment in knowing books intimately, 
and technically as well. This delicate and difficult part of its 
undertaking has been greatly facilitated by two gifts, one recur- 
ring and one completed within the current year. 

The recurring gift comes from an anonymous donor. Each 
year he provides a prize of fifty dollars for the successful competi- 
tor from the Junior Class, whose own library is considered best 
and whose descriptive essay gives a satisfactory statement of the 
principles of book selection used in creating the library. The 
judges of the annual contest are chosen from the faculty, from 
authorities on books, and from the Library staff. This year one 
of the judges, who is himself a distinguished authority on book 
collecting, wrote of the nine libraries submitted for consideration: 
"If Wellesley in three years can get nine girls to value the books 
in these lists, it is not wasting its resources, without counting 
what the rest of the student population is doing." 

The other gift was supplied by the income for the year of the 
L N. Van Nuys Fund, founded in honor of her father by Mrs. 
Richard J. Schweppe "for an 'Extra' — to fill some diff"erent need 
each year." By the use of this fund, one of the dearest hopes of 
the Library has been realized — that of setting up a small printing 
and binding laboratory. A hand press has now been installed, 
with Hannah D. French, Order Librarian, in charge. Miss 
French's laboratory for the book arts will always be a modest 
aff"air, but one open to all members of the College community 
who wish to use their heads and hands in learning these two 
ancient crafts. As a member of the faculty said not long ago: 
"The way to love books is to know books, soul and body, too." 
Simple printing, used perhaps to copy a manuscript letter, or to 
make a Christmas card, or binding a favorite document in 
handmade paper will, it is hoped, be Open Sesame for many a 

22 



Report of the Librarian 

Wellesley student to what may well become in later life a fasci- 
nating field of experiment and accomplishment. 

"To him that hath shall be given," and the infant laboratory 
has already been the recipient of several treasured gifts. Mr. 
George P. Winship, in his capacity of godfather to the whole 
enterprise, has given a font of type once used by him in his own 
press. The Sign of the George. Mrs. Augustus P. Loring, Jr., 
the accomplished author of Decorated Book Papers^ Harvard Col- 
lege Library, 1 942, has given some of the largest and most valu- 
able of the machinery for bookbinding, along with miscellaneous 
equipment, all of which probably would have been impossible to 
obtain commercially because of war priorities. Mount Holyoke 
College, by the hand of its Librarian, Miss Flora Belle Luding- 
ton, also sent a collection of English binding tools. These have 
a special association value because of their history. It seems that 
Mr. Durant spread his gifts of books not only to Wellesley but 
also to Mount Holyoke, and that tooled leather bindings were 
supplied for "runs" of journals bound in England according to 
the donor's own specifications. The tools used in decorating 
the leather bindings were carefully preserved and sent each year 
to the binders as new volumes were added to the sets. Now, 
these have been returned to Wellesley where amateur binders 
may decorate their work from designs selected long ago by the 
fastidious taste of the Founder. 

Conclusion 

It is hard to conceive of a time when the care and preservation 
of original sources and early editions constituted a more sacred 
duty for the libraries of this country than it does today. Since 
1939, books in Europe and Great Britain have been burned lit- 
erally by the millions of volumes. Whole libraries, built up 
through long centuries and thus containing unexplored resources 
for modern scholarship, in an hour or two have been bombed out 
of existence. In certain cases a photostat in the study of an 
American scholar is all that remains of what was once a unique, 
original manuscript from a ninth or tenth century scriptorium. 
As once in the Middle Ages the Germania of Tacitus and the poems 
of Catullus "hung by the thread of a single copy," so today scores 

23 



Wellesley College 

of modern classics must stand in jeopardy. A realization of 
facts such as these gives new meaning to the work of curatorship 
carried on so steadfastly through the years at Wellesley. If, as 
has been prophesied, after the war the torch of learning will be 
passed by the old world to the new, Wellesley's resources for 
scholarship, provided first by the Founder and increased by a 
long succession of like-minded benefactors, will add to their 
present usefulness an importance never dreamed of before. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Blanche Prichard McCrum, 

Librarian. 



LIBRARY STATISTICS 

ACCESSIONS 1941-42 

Volumes added by purchase 4,194 

Volumes added by gift 2,050 

Volumes added by binding 1,193 

Unbound volumes added 1,189 

Books returned to the collection 7 

Added to Treasure Room (English Poetry Collection) 103 

Added to Brooks Room 176 

Added to Ruskin Collection 41 

8,953 

Total number of volumes in Library 212,380 

Periodical titles currently received 889 

Newspapers, daily 7; weekly 4 11 

Titles in checklist of documents, reports, and pamphlets 1,510 

Inter-Library Loans: 

Books secured as loans 82 

Books requested but not received 55 

Books lent by Wellesley College Library 32 

Books requested but not lent 14 

Research questions answered 92 

Reference questions answered 2,372 



24 



Report of the Librarian 



CIRCULATION STATISTICS 



Charged to: 
Students for 
2-week loans 

General Library 23,770 



Art Library 

Astronomy Library . 
Botany Library . . . . 
Chemistry Library . 
Hygiene Library . . . 

Music Library 

Physics Library .... 
Psychology Library . 
Zoology Library . . . 



890 

147 

651 

166 

1,230 

1,004 

134 

1,152 

530 



Students 

from 
Reserve 

26,921 
3,783 

323 

227 

1,103 

871 

301 

1,092 

1,634 



Members 
of Faculty 

5,539 

394 

61 

497 

236 

875 

740 

69 

77 

746 



29,674 36,255 9,234 

CATALOGUING STATISTICS 



Current cataloguing: 

Books 

Periodicals and continuations 

Recataloguing: 

Books 

Periodicals and continuations . 



Alumnae 

and 

others 

580 
58 
27 



246 

165 

1 



Total 

56,810 
5,125 

235 
1,471 

629 
3,454 
2,780 

505 
2,321 
2,910 



1,077 76,240 



7,106 
4,449 



1,066 
459 



Titles added to the catalogue: 
By current cataloguing . . 
By recataloguing 



BINDING STATISTICS 



Periodicals 

Books rebound and repaired 

Pamphlets bound 

Music scores bound 



4,887 
741 



Volumes 

1,044 

1,736 

797 

245 



3,822 



25 



APPENDIX 

FACULTY 

APPOINTMENT AND TENURE POLICY 

Adopted by the Academic Council in April, 1942, and approved by the 

Board of Trustees 

I. Appointments, Promotions, and Salaries: 

1. Appointments to the different ranks. 

a. Assistants. Appointments of assistants shall be made ordinarily 
for one year. 

b. Instructors. It is considered in general desirable that those ap- 
pointed as instructors should have had previous teaching ex- 
perience and hold the Ph.D. degree. It is, hov^^ever, recognized 
that any department may sometimes find it expedient to appoint 
an instructor without one or the other of these qualifications; and 
that some departments may reasonably consider a substitute for 
the Ph.D. degree to be in particular circumstances as valuable as 
this degree, or even more valuable. (Examples of such equiva- 
lents are special degrees in theology or the fine arts, foreign de- 
grees, and special technical training.) 

Appointments and reappointments of instructors shall be made 
ordinarily for one year. Instructors shall be notified in writing, 
not later than January 15, if they are not to be reappointed. 

By December 1 of an instructor's third academic year of serv- 
ice, the vote of the department "small committee" for the re- 
appointment, promotion or dismissal of that instructor shall be 
reported to the Committee on Reappointments, Promotions and 
Dismissals. Upon consideration of this report by that Commit- 
tee, the instructor shall be notified in writing by the President, 
not later than the following January 15, of the action taken by 
the department and by the Committee in question. A copy of 
this letter shall be given to the department. 

c. Assistant Professors. Appointments and reappointments of assist- 
ant professors shall be made ordinarily for three years. An ini- 
tial appointment to the staff as assistant professor may, however, 
be made for a term of one or two years. Assistant professors 
shall be notified in writing, not later than January 15 of the aca- 
demic year in which their appointments expire, if they are not 
to be reappointed. 

By December 1 before the second and the third reappointment 
of an assistant professor would be announced, if made, the rec- 
ommendation of the department "small committee" shall be 

26 



Appendix 

reported to the Committee on Reappointments, Promotions and 
Dismissals, and the same procedure as that for the instructor 
shall be followed. 

d. Associate Professors. Appointments and reappointments of asso- 
ciate professors shall be made for three years. Associate pro- 
fessors shall be notified in writing, not later than December 1 of 
the academic year in which their appointments expire, if they 
are not to be reappointed, and, whenever possible, such notifica- 
tion shall be given at the close of the year before that in which the 
appointment expires. 

e. Professors. Appointments and reappointments of professors shall 
be made for five years. 

f. Lecturers. Lecturers are members of the faculty above the rank 
of instructor, who are on temporary or part-time appointment. 
Lecturers on annual appointment, if they are not to be reap- 
pointed, shall, after such procedure as in the cases above, be 
notified in writing by the President not later than January 15. 

g. In view of the early notice of a proposed termination of any 
appointment which the College agrees to give, the teacher who 
proposes to withdraw is expected to give notice in ample time. 

Promotions. Promotion from one rank to another is not based on 
length of service alone. Recommendation for promotion should al- 
ways be based upon evidence that the candidate is an able teacher and 
possesses intellectual enthusiasm and power. In judging qualifica- 
tions of candidates reference will naturally be made to research, pub- 
lications, advanced degrees, and such service and distinction as is gen- 
erally recognized by those outside this college who are working in the 
same field. Work in progress as well as work completed may be con- 
sidered. In weighing a candidate's achievement over a term of years, 
reference may, in exceptional circumstances, be made to service rend- 
ered within the college community by any individual who has been 
called upon to devote a considerable proportion of time to administra- 
tive work. 

It is the policy of the College to expect recommendations of any 
candidate for the rank of professor to be supported by unusually strong 
evidence of teaching power and intellectual distinction. 

Considering the variety of training off"ered by Wellesley College, the 
teaching staff will naturally include individuals whose energies and 
talents are most usefully employed in activities which do not result in 
those qualifications required of an associate professor or of a professor. 
Accordingly, for individuals whose contributions are thus specialized, 
the College recognizes both the assistant and the associate professor- 
ships as dignified and appropriate terminal ranks. 

It^is the general policy of the College not to retain in the rank of in- 
structor persons who have served the College in that rank for five 

27 



Wellesley College 

years, since it is considered for the best interests of both the College and 
the persons concerned to regard instructorships as training for further 
or different work at Wellesley College or elsewhere. It is, however, 
recognized that, in exceptional circumstances, departments may wish 
to reappoint as instructor an individual who has already served five 
years in this rank. When such a reappointment takes place, the in- 
dividual should be given a clear understanding in writing of the prob- 
able future action of the department in respect to reappointment and 
promotion. The same procedure shall be followed as that which is 
involved in the instructor's third academic year of service. 

3. Salaries. The minimum salary for each rank shall be printed in the 
pamphlet containing the Legislation of Wellesley College. It is recog- 
nized that there should be enough flexibility in the application of the 
salary scale to allow for special adjustments, particularly when a valu- 
able contribution is made by an individual not meeting the usual re- 
quirements for promotion. 

Increases of salaries for all ranks below that of associate professor 
shall be recommended by the "small committee" of a department. 
Salary increases for associate professors shall be recommended by the 
chairman of a department, in consultation with the members of full 
professorial rank. Recommendations for salary increase for professors 
may be initiated by the chairman of the department or by the Presi- 
dent. 

II. Tenure and Service: 

1 . Definitions. "Tenure" is interpreted to mean "reasonable expectation 
of permanency" ; that is, service may be terminated only for a cause 
which an impartial committee shall deem to be legitimate. 

"Service" is interpreted to mean service in full-time appointments. 

2. Acquisition of Tenure. Reappointment as professor or associate pro- 
fessor, after at least three years of service in either rank, or reappoint- 
ment to any professorial rank after at least six years of service as assist- 
ant professor shall be construed as establishing tenure. 

(Note: In rare cases a reappointment which according to the fore- 
going statement would give tenure may be made with the understand- 
ing that tenure is not guaranteed, if this understanding is agreed to in 
writing by both the College and the individual concerned.) 

3. Terminationof Appointment after Tenure is Achieved. The expecta- 
tion of permanency shall not be disappointed except as follows: 

a. Legitimate causes for failure to reappoint after tenure has been 
acquired include proved moral delinquency; failure to maintain 
high standards in teaching; mental disability; such physical dis- 
ability as impairs teaching power; serious failure to cooperate 
with the department or the College. Whatever the cause, it shall 

28 



Appendix 

have become apparent or have increased in gravity since the 
latest reappointment. 

b. It is recognized that in case of serious mental or physical in- 
capacity, or grave moral delinquency, the College has the right 
to dismiss at any time. 

c. Termination of permanent or long-term appointments because of 
financial exigencies, or curricular changes, should be sought only 
as a last resort, after every effort has been made to meet the need 
in other ways and to find for the teacher other employment in 
the institution. Situations which make drastic retrenchment 
of this sort necessary should preclude expansions of the staff at 
other points at the same time, except in extraordinary circum- 
stances. 

d. As soon as possible, notification in writing of a recommendation 
for dismissal or for termination of appointment in such cases as 
those described under a, b, and c shall be given by the President 
to the individual concerned, together with a statement of the 
reasons for terminating the appointment. A copy of the noti- 
fication shall be given to the department chairman. 

The individual shall have the right to state his case before the 
department committee and before the Committee on Reappoint- 
ments, Promotions and Dismissals. 

If the judgment of these committees is adverse, the individual 
shall have the right to appeal to a special committee, to be com- 
posed of five members, agreed on by the President of the College, 
the department "small committee" and the individual concerned. 
These five members shall include at least two chairmen of de- 
partments other than the department concerned, and may in- 
clude an extramural authority. At any hearing the individual 
whose dismissal or non-reappointment is in question shall have 
the right to present testimony from all sources and to have pres- 
ent at the hearing an adviser of his own choosing. 

Committee on Reappointments, Promotions and Dismissals 

The Committee on Reappointments, Promotions and Dismissals shall consist 
of the President and Dean of Instruction, ex officiis, and five members of the 
teaching staff, both professors and associate professors who have served the 
College for at least five years being eligible to membership. The members of 
the committee shall serve for five-year terms, one member being elected annually 
in the spring. 

It shall be the duty of the Committee to make recommendations to the Presi- 
dent with respect to reappointments, promotions, dismissals, and termination 
of appointments. 

This Committee shall take responsibility for 

(1) Considering recommendations from departments; 

29 



Wellesley College 

(2) Collecting from sources outside the department concerned, opinions 
regarding candidates for reappointment, promotion or dismissal; 

(3) Reviewing all appointments above the rank of instructor; 

(4) Reviewing cases of instructors, termination of whose appointments at 
the end of the five-year period is proposed. 

This Committee is specifically empowered: 

(1) To initiate proposals for promotion to any rank; 

(2) To make recommendations contrary to those of a department. 

ACADEMIC BIOGRAPHY OF NEW MEMBERS OF THE FACULTY 
AND ADMINISTRATION FOR 1942-43 

Art. 

Sara Anderson, B.A. {magna cum laude), Mount Holyoke College, 1935; M.A., 
Bryn Mawr College, 1937; American School of Classical Studies, Athens, 
1938-1940. Secretary to Editor-in-Chief, American Journal of Archaeol- 
ogy, 1940-42. Instructor. 

Otto Benesch, Ph.D. (with honors), University of Vienna, 1921. Research 
Associate Harvard College Library, 1941-42. Lecturer. 

George Rowley, B.A., University of Pennsylvania, 1913; M.F.A., Princeton 
University, 1925. Princeton University, 1924-. Mary Whiton Calkins 
Lecturer (first semester). 

Astronomy. 

Louise Marker Young, B.A. {cum laude), Western Maryland College, 1942. 
Assistant. 

Biblical History. 

Jean Warren de Ved, B.A., Mount Holyoke College, 1942. Assistant. 

Ernest Rene Lacheman, Maturite Reale, College de Geneve, 1924; B.D., 
Yale Divinity School, 1929; Ph.D., Harvard University, 1935. French 
Church, Torrington, Conn., 1936-42. Instructor. 

Mary Lucetta Mowry, B.A., Wilson College, 1934; M.A., Presbyterian Col- 
lege of Christian Education, 1938; B.D., Yale University Divinity School, 
1940. Instructor (first semester). 

Botany. 

Marcia Kelman, B.S., Tufts College, 1942. Assistant. 

Jacqueline Marie Waldron, B.A., American University, 1942. Assistant. 

Chemistry. 

Priscilla Carter, B.A., Wellesley College, 1942. Assistant. 
Muriel Ethel Holden, B.A., Mount Holyoke College, 1942. Assistant. 
Editha Underhill, B.A., Vassar College, 1916; M.S., University of Minne- 
sota, 1925. Rockford College, 1929-. Assistant Professor. 

30 



Appendix 



Economics. 



Elizabeth Wash Beardsley, B.A., Wellesley College, 1942. Assistant. 
Gertrud Berta Greig, B.S., New York University, 1931; M.A., Bryn Mawr 
College, 1933. Brooklyn College, 1940-42. Instructor. 

Education. 

Virginia Leonard, B.A., Wellesley College, 1942. Assistant. 

English Composition. 

Katherine Lever, B.A., Swarthmore College, 1936; M.A., Bryn Mawr Col- 
lege, 1937. University of Rochester, 1939-41. Instructor. 

Ralph Mehlin Williams, Cambridge University, 1928-29; B.A., Amherst 
College, 1933; Ph.D., Yale University, 1938. Boston University, 1938- 
42. Instructor. 

English Literature. 

Walter Edwards Houghton, Ph.B., Yale College, 1924; M.A., 1927, Ph.D., 
1931, Yale University. Harvard University, 1931-41. Associate 
Professor. 

Geology and Geography. 

Elizabeth Eiselen, B.A., Northwestern University, 1931; M.A., Columbia 
University, 1933. Union College, Barbourville, Kentucky, 1934-37. 
Instructor. 

History. 

Walter Carl Barnes, Lafayette College, 1908-10; B.A., Colorado College, 
1912; University of California, 1912-13; B.A. (Oxon), Oxford Univer- 
sity, 1916. Black Mountain College, Black Mountain, N. C, 1938-41. 
Lecturer. 

John Hewitt Mitchell, B.A., Yale College, 1937; Ph.D., Yale University, 
1941. Hartford Junior College, and Yale University, 1941-42. 
Instructor. 

Henry Frederick Schwarz, B.A., Harvard University, 1929; B.Litt., Oxford 
University, 1937; Ph.D., Harvard University, 1938. Harvard Univer- 
sity, 1941-42. Assistant Professor. 

Jean Willcutt, B.A., 1932, M.A., 1933, Wellesley College. Assistant. 

Hygiene and Physical Education. 

Warrine Evelyn Eastburn, Colorado State College, 1928-29; B.Sc, The Ohio 
State University, 1932; M.S., University of Oregon, 1937. New York 
University, 1940-41. Instructor. 

Elizabeth Aldrich Lane, B.S., Russell Sage College, 1940; M.A., New York 
University, 1941. Albany Academy for Girls, 1941-42. Instructor. 

31 



Wellesley College 

Mathematics. 

Evelyn Prescott Wiggin, B.A., Wellesley College, 1921; M.A., Brown Uni- 
versity, 1924; Ph.D., The University of Chicago, 1936. Randolph- 
Macon Woman's College, 1929- . Lecturer. 

Music. 
Jan La Rue, B.S., Harvard College, 1940; M.F.A., Princeton University, 
1942. Private teaching and tutoring. Instructor. 

Physics. 

Ada Finn Abuza, B.A., Wellesley College, 1942. Assistant. 

Janet Brown Guernsey, B.A., Wellesley College, 1935. Baldwin School, 

1935-36. Assistant. 
Hedwig Kohn, Dr. phil., 1913, Dr. phil. habil., 1930, University of Breslau. 

Woman's College, University of North Carolina, Feb., 1941-June 1942. 

Lecturer. 
Mary Schabacker, B.A., Wilson College, 1942. Assistant. 

Political Science, 
Julia Juanita Henderson, B.A., 1936, M.A., 1937, University of Illinois. 

Social Security Board, 1938-42. Instructor. 
Jean Willcutt, Assistant. (See History.) 

Psychology. 

Babette Frances Samelson, B.A., Wellesley College, 1939; M.A., Radcliffe 

College, 1941. Assistant. 
Mary Margaret Shirley, B.A., Indiana University, 1922; M.A., 1925, Ph.D., 

1927, University of Minnesota. Psychologist, Children's Aid Society of 

Pennsylvania, 1941-42. Lecturer (second semester). 
Marian Sigler Wessell, B.A., Wellesley College, 1936; M.A., Brown Uni- 

versity, 1938. Brown University, 1936-38. Assistant. 

Sociology. 

Mildred Povalski, B.A., Brooklyn College, 1937; M.A., Columbia University, 
1942. Office of Radio Research, Columbia University, February, 1941- 
August, 1942. Assistant and Instructor. 

Spanish. 

Concha Breton, B.A., Instituto General y Tecnico, Barcelona, 1921; M.A., 
Middlebury College, 1936. Penn Hall School and Junior College, 1926- 
42. Lecturer. 

Speech. 

Robert Joseph Wade, Diploma, Swain School of Design, 1928. Emerson 

College, 1937- . Assistant in Theatre Workshop. 
Arthur Eldon Winkler, B.S. in Ed., Boston University, 1938; New England 

Conservatory of Music, 1935-37; M.F.A., Yale University, 1941. 

Stephens College, 1941-42. Director oj theatre Workshop. 

32 



Appendix 

Zoology and Physiology. 

Katherine Suydam Brehme, B.A., Barnard College, 1930; M.A., University 
of Virginia, 1932; Ph.D., Columbia University, 1939. Editor of Volumes 
9 and 1 0, Proceedings of the Symposium on Quantitative Biology, Cold 
Spring Harbor, 1941-42. Instructor in ^oology. 

Norma Harriet Knipple, B.A., Smith College, 1942. Assistant. 

Margaret Bartholomew Meikle, B.S., Tufts College, 1942. Assistant. 

Administration . 

Josephine Dickinson Harbridge, B.A., Milwaukee Downer College, 1934; 
M.A., 1939, B.L.S., 1940, University of Wisconsin. Detroit Public 
Library, 1940-42. Circulation Assistant in the Library. 

Winifred St. John Hennig, B.S., Simmons College, 1920. Ginn and Co., 
1926-31. Assistant Order Librarian. 

Abigail Eliot Smith, B.A., Wellesley College, 1922; M.D., Washington 
University, 1927. Washington University and St. Louis County Hospi- 
tal, 1941-42. Assistant Physician. 

Jane Louise Gold, B.A., Wellesley College, 1941. George School, 1941-42. 
Assistant to the Head of Tower Court. 

Marion Willis Mariotti. Head of Washington House. 

Mildred lone McKenzie, B.A., Wellesley College, 1916. College Inn, Con- 
necticut College, 1941-42. Director of Horton, Hallowell and Shepard 
Houses. 

Margaret Culbertson Myers, George School, 1941-42. Head of Elms. 

Eila Winifred Doyne Nevile, School Certificate, Oxford, 1901. British School, 
Montevideo, Uruguay, South America, 1914-17. Head of Crofton 
House. 

Emma-Leigh Rhett, Stratford College, 1909-13. Summit Trust Co. of 
Summit, N. J., and other business firms, 1939-42. Head of Little House. 

Grace Archibald Vinall, B.A., Bates College, 1910; Certificate of Depart- 
ment of Hygiene and Physical Education, Wellesley College, 1912. 
Social Director, Alumni Residence Halls, New York State College for 
Teachers, 1940-41. Head of Webb House. 

LEAVES OF ABSENCE IN 1942-43 

For the first semester: 

Andree Bruel, Associate Professor of French. 

Katy Boyd George, Associate Professor of Biblical History. 

For the second semester: 

Margaret Alger Hayden, Associate Professor of Zoology. 
Ruth Johnstin, Professor of Chemistry. 
Edith Brandt Mallory, Associate Professor of Psychology. 
Edith Melcher, Assistant Professor of French. 

33 



Wellesley College 

For the year: 

Helen Gertrude Russell, Assistant Professor of Mathematics. 

Laurine Mack Bongiorno, Associate Professor of Art. 

Nicolette Pernot Ringgold, Assistant Professor of French. 

William Alexander Campbell, Associate Professor of Art (war service). 

CHANGES IN RANK IN 1942-43 

Elizabeth Beall, from Assistant Professor of Hygiene and Physical Education 
to Associate Professor. 

Laurine Mack Bongiorno, from Assistant Professor of Art to Associate Professor. 

Catherine Louise Burke, from Assistant in Physics to Instructor. 

Marie Louise Edel, from Instructor in English Literature to Assistant Professor. 

Dorothy Heyworth, from Assistant Professor of Physics to Associate Professor. 

Marjorie Henry Ilsley, from Assistant Professor of French to Associate Pro- 
fessor. 

Margaret Marion Macdonald, from Acting Director of the Choir and Instruc- 
tor in Music to Director of the Choir and Lecturer. 

Shirley Brander Tuck, from Assistant in Chemistry to Instructor. 

Katharine Fuller Wells, from Instructor in Hygiene and Physical Education to 
Assistant Professor. 

Ella Keats Whiting, from Associate Professor of English Literature to Professor. 

RESIGNATIONS AND EXPIRED APPOINTMENTS, JUNE, 1942 

Including Resignations During 1941-42 

Esther J. Aberdeen, Assistant Professor of Geology. 

Thelma G. Alper, Assistant in Psychology. 

Moses Bailey, Lecturer in Biblical History. 

Caroline Barker, Assistant in Botany. 

Mary L. Barrett, Instructor in Physics. 

Mary C. Bliss, Professor of Botany (retired). 

Antonia Boissevain, Assistant in Chemistry. 

Beatrice L. Booth, Assistant in Botany. 

Harper G. Brown, Lecturer in English Composition. 

Mary Louise Cannell, Assistant in Psychology. 

Robert J. Garner, Instructor in Spanish. 

Gertrude M. Christiansen, Assistant in Zoology. 

Eveleth Clark, Assistant in the Department of Political Science. 

Florence A. Duckering, Assistant Physician. 

Katharine M. Durrell, Instructor in Economics. 

Elizabeth S. Dyer, Assistant in the Department of Sociology. 

Marjorie G. Eaton, Assistant in the Department of Education. 

Carolyn C. Elbel, Assistant in the Department of Biblical History. 

34 



Appendix 

Robert Engberg, Lecturer in Biblical History. 

Ada V. Espenshade, Instructor in Geology and Geography. 

Frances G. Findley, Assistant in Physics. 

M. Eleanor Finger, Assistant in the Department of Economics. 

Mary F. Fitzpatrick, Assistant in the Department of History. 

Nancy E. Foster, Head of Beebe Hall. 

Mary B. Gilson, Lecturer in Economics. 

Jean H. Harris, Instructor in Hygiene and Physical Education. 

Rolf N. B. Haugen, Instructor in Political Science. 

Roberta M. Higginbottom, Instructor in Zoology. 

James C. Hill, Instructor in Economics. 

Elisabeth Hodder, Professor of History (retired). 

Louise W. Holborn, Instructor in History. 

Richard H. Howland, Instructor in Art. 

Hans Kelsen, Visiting Professor of Political Science. 

Elizabeth S. Kirkwood, Instructor in Zoology. 

Frances L. Knapp, Dean of Freshmen (deceased). 

Anna J. Lesznai, Instructor in Art. 

Marion C. Loizeaux, Assistant Physician. 

Harriette W. Long, Lecturer in Botany. 

R. Eleanor Metheny, Assistant Professor of Hygiene and Physical Education. 

Ava C. Minsher, Manager of the College Post Office. 

Anna Mirante, Instructor in Italian. 

Margaret M. Mitchell, Assistant in Psychology. 

Hugo Munsterberg, Lecturer in Art. 

Mary C. Patterson, Director of Horton, Hallowell, and Shepard Houses. 

Dorothy N. Pond, Instructor in Spanish. 

Marguerite M. Raymond, Head of Pomeroy Hall. 

Adele de la B. Robinson, Assistant Professor of Art. 

Janet P. Robinson, Instructor in Art. 

Georgia Robison, Assistant Professor of History. 

Edith M. Smaill, Director of Theatre Workshop (retired). 

Ann A. Smith, Assistant Professor of Hygiene and Physical Education. 

Esther H. Swaffield, Assistant to the Head of Tower Court. 

Helen G. Thomas, Lecturer in Geography. 

Samuel L. Thorndike, Instructor in Astronomy. 

Margaret D. Truitt, Librarian in the Social Sciences. 

Annie K. Tuell, Professor of English Literature (retired). 

Shirley M. Ward, Assistant in Physiology. 

Anne Wellington, Executive Secretary of the Board of Admission. 

Gordon B. Wellman, Associate Professor of Biblical History (deceased). 

Marjorie J. Willits, Assistant in Astronomy. 

Evelyn B. Yates, Appointment Secretary in the Placement Office. 

Genevieve Young, Instructor in Chemistry. 

Victor Zuckerkandl, Lecturer in Music. 

35 



Wellesley College 

PUBLICATIONS OF THE FACULTY 

July, 1941 to July, 1942 

Art 

SiRARPiE Der Nersessian, Doctcur es Lettres, Professor. 

Remarks on the Date of the Menologium and the Psalter written for Basil II. — 
Byzantion, International Journal of Byzantine Studies, vol. XV, 1940-41, 
pp. 104-125. The Direct Approach in the Study of Art History — College 
Art Journal, March 1942, vol. I, no. 3, pp. 54-60. 

Bernard Chapman Heyl, M.F.A., Assistant Professor. 

Reviev^s of: W. Weisbach's Spanish Baroque Art — College Art Journal, Nov., 
1941, vol. 1, no. 1; E. D. G. Trapier's Eugenio Lucas y VsidiWa.— The Art 
Bulletin, March, 1942, vol. XXIV, no. 1. 

Adele de la Barre Robinson, B.Des., M.A., Assistant Professor. 

Exhibition of Indian Baskets — College Art Journal, Jan., 1942, vol. I, no. 2, 
pp. 37-38. 

Astronomy 

John C. Duncan, Ph.D., Professor. 

Essentials of Astronomy— Harper & Brothers, 1942: 181 pages, 87 figures, 
colored frontispiece. Wellesley's Great Astronomer — The Wellesley Maga- 
zine, XXV, 5, 445, June 1941. The Brothers SUpher— T/z^ Sky, V, 10, 
August, 1941. 

Helen W. Dodson, Ph.D., Assistant Professor. 

(With S. E. A. van Dijke) Solar Phenomena Preceding the Ionospheric Storm of 
March 1, 1941 — Journal of Terrestrial Magnetism and Electricity, August, 
1941; Recent Solar Observations in Hydrogen and Helium Light — Astro- 
physical Journal, 95, 325, March, 1942. 

Samuel L. Thorndike, Ph.D., Instructor. 

Variable Stars in High Galactic Field Zll— Harvard Observatory Bulletin, No. 916. 

Biblical History 
Muriel S. Curtis, B.A., B.D., Professor. 

Scholars Help Sophomores— CAmtot/ow, vol. VI, no. 4, Autumn, 1941, 
pp. 495-504. Review of H. S. Smith's Faith and Nurture— TA^ Journal 
oj Bible and Religion, vol. X, no. 2, May, 1942, pp. 116-118. 

Herbert J. Gezork, Ph.D., Assistant Professor. 

From International Anarchy to a World Community — Wellesley Magazine, 
Dec, 1941. Aspirations of the Christian Church in the Present Crisis— 

36 



Appendix 

The Christian Advocate, Jan., 1942 and "Evanston Series 1941." God in 
Hitler's Germany — The Baptist Student, Feb., 1942. 

Paul L. Lehmann, Th.D., Assistant Professor. 

The Promise of Theology in America — The Student World, vol. 34, no. 4, Jan., 
1942. 

Robert M. Montgomery, B.A., B.D., Instructor. 

Review of J. Muir's How Firm a Foundation — Journal of Bible and Religion, 
vol. IX, no. 4. 

Botany 

Delaphine G. Rosa, Ph.D., Assistant Professor. 

(With P. L. Norton, L. P. Wilson and R. Johnstin) The Effect of Pectin and 
Nickel Pectinate on the Healing of Granulating Wounds in Albino Rats — 
American Journal of Surgery 56, 573-578, 1942. 

Elizabeth B. Johnson, Ph.D., Instructor. 

A developmental analysis of cell length as related to stem length — American 
Journal of Botany 29, no. 2, pp. 179-188, 1942. 

Chemistry 

Helen S. French, Ph.D., Professor. 

Review of E. V. Lynn's Organic Chemistry, with Applications to Pharmacy 
and Medicine — Journal of Chemical Education, 19, 199, 1942. 

Mary A. Griggs, Ph.D., Professor. 

(With L. P. Wilson) Analysis of Sea Water in a Closed Aquarium — Trans. 
of New Tork Academy of Science, Ser. II, vol. 3, p. 218, June, 1941. 

Ruth Johnstin, Ph.D., Professor. 

Review of H. C. Sherman's Chemistry of Food and Nutrition — Journal of 
Chemical Education, 18, 499, 1941. (With P. Norton, L. P. Wilson and 
D. G. Rosa) The Effect of Pectin and Nickel Pectinate on the Healing of 
Granulating Wounds in Albino Rats — American Journal of Surgery, 56, 
573, 1942. 

Margaret K. Seikel, Ph.D., Instructor. 

Ethylene Glycol Determination in and Removal from Commercial Alkyl 
Ethers of Diethylene Glycol — Industrial and Engineering Chemistry, Analytical 
Edition, 13, 388, June, 1941. 

Economics 

Elizabeth Donnan, B.A., Professor. 

(With H. R. Mussey) Economic Principles and Modern Practice, Boston, 1942, 
pp. 840. 

37 



Wellesley College 

Lucy W. Killough, Ph.D., Associate Professor. 

Income and Profits Taxes— American Yearbook, 1947, New York, 1942. 

Elisabeth A. Curtiss, M.A., Lecturer. 

Review of P. Campbell's Consumer Representation in the New Deal — Journal 
of Political Economy, Feb., 1942. 

Education 

John Pilley, M.A. Oxon., Associate Professor. 

(In collaboration with committee of the Progressive Education Association) 
After- War Educational Reconstruction: A Proposal to Men of Goodwill — 
Personal Growth Leaflet No. 151, published by the National Education 
Association. 

Laura Hooper, Ph.D., Lecturer. 

Give me a Barn— Childhood Education, May, 1942. (In collaboration with 

others) Good English Habits and English for You and Me— Owr Language 

Series, Ginn, 1942. 

Christine M. Gibson, M.A., Instructor. 

A Fireside Talk in Basic — Educational Method, March, 1942. 

English Composition 

Elizabeth W. Manwaring, Ph.D., Professor. 

(With H. R. Warfel) Editing of Of the People— Oxford University Press, May, 
1942. 

Edith C. Johnson, Ph.D., Professor. 

Why Wellesley? — Wellesley Magazine, June, 1942. 

Harper G. Brown, M.A., Lecturer. 

Shifting into High— The Writer, vol. 54, no. 8, Aug., 1941. The Art of Under- 
standing — Friends Intelligencer, vol. 98, no. 33, and vol. 98, no. 34, Aug., 
1941. (With M. T. Brown) The British Periodical Market in Wartime— 
The Writer, vol. 54, no. 9, Sept., 1941. (With M. T. Brown) Orange 
Boxes— TAf Christian Science Monitor, vol. XXXIII, no. 303, Nov., 1941. 
God as Motive Force— Friends Intelligencer, vol. 98, no. 49, Dec, 1941. 
Meditation Is Adventure— Friends Intelligencer, vol. 90, no. 4, Jan., 1942. 
From Little Acorns— T/^? Writer, vol. 55, no. 2, Feb., 1942. I Am You: 
You Are Me— Fellowship, vol. VIII, no. 2, Feb., 1942. To Lead or Follow 
— The Friend, vol. 115, no. 23, May, 1942. 

English Literature 

Martha H. Shackford, Ph.D., Professor. 

The Authorship of "Aeschylus Soliloquy" — London Times Literary Supplement. 
March, 1942. 

38 



Appendix 

Bertha M. Stearns, M.A., Professor. 

Memnonia; the Launching of a Utopia — New England Quarterly, June, 1942. 
Review of C. L. Young's Emerson's Montaigne — The Wellesley Magazine, 
Dec, 1941. 

Katharine C. Balderston, Ph.D., Professor. 

Edition of Thraliana, 2 vols. The Clarendon Press, Oxford, 1942. 

French 

Rene E. de Messieres, Agrege de I'Universite, Professor. 

La culture frangaise instrument de defense — Le Travailleur, Nov., 1941. In- 
troduction a I'intelligence de Marcel Proust — Pour la Victoire, April, 1 942. 
Un document sur le premier etat de la pensee de Marcel Proust — Romanic 
Review, April, 1942. 

Greek 

Barbara P. McCarthy, Ph.D., Associate Professor. 

Literary Reminiscences in Psellus's Chronographia — Byzantion, XV, 296-299. 
Reviews of: E. Bornemann's Odyssee Interpretationen — Classical Weekly, 
XXXV, 7-8; F. W. Householder, Jr.'s Literary Quotations and Allusions 
in Lucian — Classical Weekly, XXXV, 225-226. 

History 

Barnette Miller, Ph.D., Professor. 

The Palace School of Muhammad the Conqueror — Harvard Historical Mono- 
graphs, vol. XVII, Harvard University Press, 1941. 

E. Faye Wilson, Ph.D., Assistant Professor. 

The War and the Women of the World — The Eleusis of Chi Omega, XLIII, pp. 
318-322, Sept., 1941. 

Louise W. Holborn, Ph.D., Instructor. 

Printing and the Growth of the Protestant Movement in Germany — Church 
History, June, 1942. 

Hygiene and Physical Education 

Eleanor Metheny, Ph.D., Assistant Professor. 

Breathing Capacity during the First Decade of Life: A Review of the Literature 
on Techniques, Standards, and Clinical Implications — Journal of Pediatrics, 
XIX, no. 6, 841-853, Dec, 1941. 

Ann a. Smith, M.A., Assistant Professor. 

For Fitness, Run — Track and Field Official Guide, 1942-43 and Journal of Health, 
Physical Education and Recreation, April, 1942. 

39 



Wellesley College 

Katharine F. Wells, M.S., Instructor. 

How Well Do You Know Your First Aid?— Hjgeia, vol. XX, no. 3, March, 1 942. 

Latin 
Margaret E. Taylor, Ph.D., Assistant Professor. 
Abstracts of Journals for Classical Weekly. 

Mathematics 

Marion E. Stark, Ph.D., Associate Professor. 

Review of G. M. Merriman's To Discuss Mathematics — National Mathematics 
Magazine, March, 1 942. (With H. A. Merrill) A Mathematical Contest— 
American Mathematical Monthly, March, 1942, pp. 191-192. Methods of 
Mathematical Proof for Undergraduates— JVa^zowa/ Mathematics Magazine, 
April, 1942, pp. 350-351. 

Katharine E. Hazard, Ph.D., Instructor. 

Index Theorems for the Problem of Bolza in the Calculus of Variations — 
Contributions to the Calculus oj Variations, The University of Chicago Press, 
1942. 

Philosophy 

Mary L. Coolidge, Ph.D., Professor. 

Ethics — Apollonian and Dionysian— T^^ Jowrwa/ oJ Philosophy, vol. XXXVIII, 
no. 17, August, 1941. 

Physics 

Catherine L. Burke, M.A., Assistant. 

Abstract of paper on Dielectric Absorption in Cellulose Nitrate and in Methyl 
Methacrylate — Physical Review, vol. 61, p. 100. 

Political Science 

Louise Overacker, Ph.D., Professor. 

Campaign Finance in the Presidential Election of \940— American Political 
Review, vol. 35, pp. 701-727, Aug., 1941. Review of Gallup and Rae's 
The Pulse of Democracy, American Political Science Review, vol. 36, pp. 375- 
376, April, 1942. Trends in Party Campaign Funds— TA^ Future of Gov- 
ernment in the United States: Essays in Honor of Charles E. Merriam, pp. 1 1 9-1 44, 
University of Chicago Press, 1942. 

Hans Kelsen, Dr. jur., Mary Whiton Calkins Visiting Professor. 

La Teoria Pura de Derecho. Introduccion a la Problematica cientifica del 
Derecho — Biblioteca del Instituto Argentina de Filosojiajuridicay social. Buenos 
Aires, 1941. Law and Peace in International Relations — Holmes Lectures, 
Harvard University Press, 1942. International Peace by Court or Gov- 
ernments — The American Journal of Sociology, vol. XLVI, 1941, pp. 571-581. 
The Pure Theory of Law and Analytical Jurisprudence — Harvard Law 

40 



Appendix 

Review, vol. LV, 1941, pp. 44-70; Spanish Translation, La Ley, Buenos 
Aires, diciembre, 1941. Recognition in International Law — American 
Journal oj International Law, vol. 35, 1941, pp. 605-617. Essential Condi- 
tions of International Justice — Proceedings of the Thirty-fifth Annual Meeting 
of the American Society of International Law, 1941, pp. 70-86; Science and Man, 
1942, pp. 375-398. The Law as a Specific Social Technique — The Univer- 
sity of Chicago Law Review, vol. 9, 1941, pp. 75-97. Causality and Retribu- 
tion — Philosophy of Science, vol. 8, 1941, pp. 533-556. Judgments of Value 
in the Science of Law — Journal of Social Philosophy and Jurisprudence, vol. 7, 
1942, pp. 312-333. Judicial Review of Legislation. A Comparative 
Study of the Austrian and the American Constitution — The Journal of 
Politics, vol. 4, no. 2, May, 1942, pp. 183-200. Revision of the Covenant 
of the League — World Organization. A Symposium of the Institute on World 
Organization, 1942. Platonic Love — The American Imago, vol. Ill, 1942, 
pp. 1-100. Reviews of: R. Pound's Contemporary Juristic Theory — 
Harvard Law Review, vol. LIV, 1941, p. 1261; H. Cairns' The Theory of 
Legal Science — Iowa Law Review, vol. 27, 1941, pp. 174-180; P. B. Potter's 
Article XIX of the Covenant of the League of Nations — The American 
Journal of International Law, vol. 36, 1942, pp. 357-358. 

M. Margaret Ball, Ph.D., Assistant Professor. 

The Leadership Principle in National Socialism — Journal of the History of Ideas, 
vol. 3, Jan., 1942, pp. 74-93. 

Psychology 

Edna Heidbreder, Ph.D., Professor. 

(With H. Peak) Tentative suggestions on undergraduate psychological training 

for women in the emergency — Psychology and the War, edited by S. H. Britt, 

Psychological Bulletin, 39, 369-410, June, 1942. 

Michael J. Zigler, Ph.D., Professor. 

(With F. L. Dimmick, et al.) Report of the delegates of the American Psycho- 
logical Association to the Inter-Society Color Council for 1941 — Psycho- 
logical Bulletin, 38, 868-870, 1941. (With A. H. Holway) Scientific paper 
prepared for the Better Vision Institute, Rockefeller Center, New York: 
The function of the natural pupil in normal vision. Abstracts of all articles 
in the Journal of Experimental Psychology for the Psychological Abstracts. 

Thelma G. Alper, M.A., Assistant. 

Education in Nazi Germany — Copies distributed by the Committee for Na- 
tional Morale, Washington, D. C. 

Sociology 

Leland H. Jenks, Ph.D., Professor. 

Economics — The Caribbean Area — (Burgin ed.) Handbook of Latin American 
Studies: 1940, Harvard University Press, 1941, pp. 104-134. Review of 

41 



Wellesley College 

Barnes and Becker's Social Thought from Lore to Science — Journal of 
Abnormal and Social Psychology, Oct., 1941, pp. 601-603. 

Mary B. Treudley, Ph.D., Associate Professor. 

Review of H. Cantril's The Psychology of Social Movements — Social Service 
Review, June, 1942. 

Florence R. Kluckhohn, Ph.D., Instructor. 

Review of Spicer's Pascua: A Yaqui Village — American Journal of Sociology, 
Nov., 1941, p. 517. 

Spanish 
Jorge Guillen, Doctor en Letras, Visiting Professor. 

Poems: Caminante de Puerto, Noche de Luna — La Nacion de Buenos Aires, ]\i\y, 
1941; La Vida Kta\—Revista "3", Lima, Peru, 1941; Mundo en Claro— 
Sur, Buenos Aires, Argentina, 1941. 

Speech 
Cecile de Banke, Assistant Professor. 
The School Train of Ontario — The Christian Science Monitor, April 11, 1942. 

Zoology and Physiology 
E. Elizabeth Jones, Ph.D., Assistant Professor. 

The effect of testosterone propionate on mammary tumors in mice of the C3H 
stxam— Cancer Research, vol. 5, no. 10, pp. 787-789, 1941. 

Louise P. Wilson, Ph.D., Assistant Professor. 

Tolerance of larvae of Drosophila for nucleic acid components: adenine — 
Growth, vol. 6, no. 1, pp. 1-6, 1942. (With P. L. Norton, R. Johnstin, 
and D. G. Rosa) The effect of pectin and nickel pectinate on the healing 
of granulating wounds in albino rats — American Journal of Surgery, vol. 56, 
no. 3, pp. 573-578, 1942. 

Mary Sears, Ph.D., Instructor. 

Notes on the phytoplankton on Georges Bank in 1940 — Journal of Marine Re- 
search, vol. IV, no. 3, pp. 247-257, 1941. 

Administration 
Mildred H. McAfee, M.A., LL.D., L.H.D., President. 

The College Library as Seen by a College President — College and Research Li- 
braries, vol. II, no. 4, Sept., 1941. Educating Daughters — The Atlantic 
Monthly, vol. 169, no. 2, Feb., 1942. 

42 



Oct. 


6 


Oct. 


8 


Oct. 


9 


Oct. 


13 


Oct. 


14 



Appendix 

LECTURES, CONCERTS, AND ART EXHIBITIONS 

LECTURES 

Oct. 1. Pushkin as a West European Writer — Vladimir Nabokov, Resident 
Lecturer in Comparative Literature. 

Poet's Reading — Stephen Vincent Benet. 

Lermontov as a West European Writer — Vladimir Nabokov. 

Problems of the Young Child and Psychoanalysis — Margaret Fries. 
(Marriage Lecture Committee.) 

Poet's Reading — Robert Nathan. 

Homer — Professor John H. Finley, Jr., Harvard University. (Hor- 
ton Lecture.) 
Oct. 15. Gogol as a West European Writer — Vladimir Nabokov. 

The Present Position and the Future of the Law of Nations — Hersch 
Lauterpacht, Visiting Professor of Political Science. (Lecture 
Committee and Department of Political Science.) 

Biological Aspects of Marriage — James C. Janney, M.D. (Mar- 
riage Lecture Committee.) 

Phonetics and Pronunciation — Nicolette Pernot, Assistant Professor 
of French. (Department of French.) 

Obstetrics — Meinolph V. Kappius, M.D. (Marriage Lecture 
Committee.) 

The Present Position and the Future of the Law of Nations — 
Hersch Lauterpacht. 

What Next in Europe? — Vera Micheles Dean, Research Director of 
the Foreign Policy Association. (Forum, Departments of 
History and Political Science.) 

Russia as a World Power — Vera Micheles Dean. 

Building a New World — Vera Micheles Dean. 

The Western Hemisphere Looks to the Future — Vera Micheles 
Dean. 

Poet's Reading — Leonard Bacon. 

Marriage on a Budget — Elisabeth A. Curtiss, Lecturer in Eco- 
nomics. (Marriage Lecture Committee.) 

Archaeology and Its Bearing on Biblical History — Robert Engberg, 
Lecturer in Biblical History. 

Graduate Work — Ella Keats Whiting, Dean of Instruction. (Place- 
ment Office.) 

The Way of the Future — Reinhold Schairer of the U. S. Com- 
mittee on Educational Reconstruction. (Department of 
Education.) 
Nov. 17. Some Approaches to Problems of Crime — Dean A. Warren Stearns 
of Tufts Medical School. (Department of Sociology.) 

43 



Oct. 


17. 


Oct. 


21. 


Oct. 


22. 


Oct. 


23. 


Oct. 


27. 


Oct. 


28. 


Oct. 


29. 


Oct. 


30. 


Nov. 


3. 


Nov. 


4. 


Nov. 


6. 


Nov. 


11. 


Nov. 


14. 



Wellesley College 

Alaskan Glaciers — Bradford Washburn, Director of New England 
Museum of Natural History. (Department of Geology and 
Geography.) 
Spain in Russia — Vladimir Nabokov. (Department of Spanish.) 

Nov. 24. The Importance and Meaning of Drawing in the History of Art — 
Otto Benesch, Visiting Lecturer in Art. (Department of Art.) 
L'egalite humaine — Visiting Professor Jacques Maritain, Columbia 
University. (Department of French.) 

Nov. 25. Wordsworth's "Ode on the Intimations of Immortality" — Professor 
Frederick Pottle, Yale University. (Poets' Reading Fund.) 

Dec. 1 . The Origin and the Development of the Religious Drama through 
the Middle Ages — Professor George La Plana, Harvard Uni- 
versity. (Circolo Italiano and Classical Club.) 

Dec. 2. Life, Letters, and Education — Professor Douglas Bush, Harvard 
University. (Departments of Philosophy and English Litera- 
ture.) 

Dec. 8. Opera in the American Scene — C. David Hocker of the Philadel- 
phia Opera Company. (Department of Music.) 

Dec. 12. Anthropology and Education^Associate Professor Ruth Benedict, 
Columbia University. (Department of Education.) 

Dec. 15. Techniques of Debating — Isabella McL. Stephens, Instructor in 
Education. (Forum.) 

Jan. 12. The Artificial Creation of Speech^. O. Perrine, Assistant Vice- 
President of the American Telephone and Telegraph Company. 
(College Lecture Committee and Departments of Physics, 
Psychology, Music, and Speech.) 

Jan. 14. The Arrangement of Crystals in Metamorphic Rocks — Louise 
Kingsley, Associate Professor of Geology. (Sigma Xi.) 

Jan. 20. Food in National Defense — Winifred Cullis, Director of the Wom- 
en's Division of the British Library of Information. (Nutrition 
Education Committee and College Lecture Committee.) 

Jan. 22. Teaching — Millicent C. Mcintosh, Headmistress of the Brearley 
School. (Placement Office.) 

Jan. 23. Demonstrations of Properties of Matter at Low Temperatures — 
Louise S. McDowell, Professor of Physics. (Department of 
Physics.) 

Feb. 11. Civil Service Jobs for College Graduates — Arthur S. Fleming, Civil 
Service Commissioner. (Placement Office.) 

Feb. 16. L'avenir de la culture frangaise en Amerique — Professor Henri 
Peyre, Yale University. (Department of French.) 
Problems in the Geology of Newfoundland — Professor Richard F. 
Flint, Yale University. (Department of Geology and Geog- 
raphy.) 

44 



Feb. 


25. 


Mar. 


3. 


Mar. 


4. 


Mar. 


9. 



Appendix 

Feb. 17. Historia interna de la literatura gauchesca — Professor Amado 
Alonso, Universities of Buenos Aires and La Plata. (Depart- 
ment of Spanisli.) 

Feb. 23. Leonardo, the Great — Vladimir Nabokov. (Department of Italian 
and Circolo Italiano.) 

Feb. 24. Making Democracy Safe for the World — Professor Carl Becker, 
Cornell University. (Department of History.) 
Tolstoi and Turgeniev — Vladimir Nabokov. 
Pick Your Job and Land It — Mrs. Mary G. Edlund of the Man 

Marketing Clinic, New York. (Placement Office.) 
Tutchev — Vladimir Nabokov. 

Rembrandt — Otto Benesch. (Department of Art.) 
British Labor and the War — Professor Richard Tawney, London 
School of Economics. (Department of Biblical History.) 

Mar. 10. The Place of Art in Modern Society or a Defense of Story Telling — 
Charles Morgan. (Sophie Hart Lecture.) 

Mar. 11. Tchekov — Vladimir Nabokov. 

The Theatre Guild's Production of "The Rivals" — Sam Pearce. 
(Theatre Workshop.) 

Mar. 17. The Triumph of the Fourth Decimal Place — Professor Emma P. 
Carr, Mt. Holyoke College. (Honors Day.) 

Mar. 18. Foreign Languages and Intercultural Relations — Richard Pattee, 
Department of State. (Lecture Committee and Placement 
Office.) 

Mar. 20. Children in War — Greta Bibring, psychoanalyst. (Department of 
Education.) 

Mar. 23-25. Forum on Religion: Basic Christian Convictions — Robert L, 
Calhoun, Yale University. (Christian Association.) 

Mar. 27. Our Changing Democracy — Mrs. Franklin D. Roosevelt. (Forum 
and International Student Service.) 

Mar. 30. Shakespeare Under King James — Professor C. F. Tucker Brooke, 
Yale University. (Furness Fund Lecture.) 

Mar. 31. Opportunities for Women in Scientific Defense Work — Dean Ed- 
ward L. Morcland, Massachusetts Institute of Technology. 
(Placement Office and Department of Physics.) 

Apr. 14. What Is Pan Americanism? — Luis Quintanilla, Minister-Counsellor, 
Mexican Embassy. (Lecture Committee, Defense Committee, 
Departments of History, Economics, Political Science, Geog- 
raphy, Sociology, Spanish.) 

Apr. 15. Education for World Conquest in Imperial Japan — Professor 
George Barker, recently of Imperial L^niversity, Tokyo. (De- 
partments of Education and Political Science.) 

Apr. 17. How Radio Works — Louise S. McDowell, Professor of Physics. 
(Department of Physics.) 

Apr. 20. The Art of Daumier — Otto Benesch. (Department of Art.) 

45 



Wellesley College 

Apr. 21. Poet's Reading — Theodore Spencer, Harvard University. 

Christianity and the Secular Spirit — Professor Werner Richter, 
formerly of the University of Berlin; now of Elmhurst College. 
(Department of Biblical History.) 

Apr. 22. Roman High Seriousness and Roman Laughter — Professor E. K. 
Rand, Harvard University. (Department of History.) 

Apr. 27. Reading of Vachel Lindsay's Poems — Mrs. Olive Lindsay Wake- 
field. (Poets' Reading Fund.) 

Apr. 28. Undulant Fever — Dr. Alice Evans, United States Department of 
Public Health. (Sigma Xi.) 

Apr. 29. The Effects of Calamities upon Ethical and Religious Life of the 
Society — Professor Pitirim A. Sorokin, Harvard University. 
(Department of Sociology.) 

May 4. Symbolic Action in Children — Professor Charlotte Buehler, formerly 
of University of Vienna. (Department of Psychology.) 

May 11. Four Types of Modern Directors: Naturalistic, Impressionistic, Ex- 
pressionistic, and Constructivistic — A. M. Nagler, dramatic 
critic. (Theatre Workshop and Department of English 
Composition.) 

May 12. Our National Parks — Cecil Atwater. (Department of Geology and 
Geography.) 

May 18. Vergil: His Art and Personality — Professor H. W. Prescott, Uni- 
versity of Chicago and Princeton University. (Department of 
Latin.) 

May 20. Vamos a Mexico — Anita Oyarzabal, Assistant Professor of Spanish. 
(Department of Spanish.) 
Application of Immune Reactions in Public Health — Leo Rane, 
Massachusetts Antitoxin and Vaccine Laboratory. (Depart- 
ment of Botany.) 
June 15. Commencement Address — His Excellency, Dr. Hu Shih, Ambassa- 
dor of China to the United States. 

SUNDAY SERVICES 

Sept. 21. Dr. Ralph W. Sockman, Christ Church, New York City. 

Sept. 28. Dr. Douglas Horton, Minister of the General Council of the Con- 
gregational and Christian Churches of the United States. 

Oct. 5. Dr. Reinhold Niebuhr, Union Theological Seminary, New York 
City. 

Oct. 12. Dr. Charles R. Brown, Dean Emeritus, Divinity School, Yale 
University. 

Oct. 19. Professor T. Hayes Procter, Department of Philosophy, Wellesley 
College. 

Oct. 26. Dr. Raymond Calkins, Pastor Emeritus, First Church, Cambridge, 
Mass. 

Nov. 2. Rt. Rev. W. Appleton Lawrence, Bishop of Western Massachusetts. 

46 



Appendix 

Nov. 9. Dr. Rufus M. Jones, Society of Friends, Haverford, Pa. 

Nov. 1 6. Dr. Basil Mathews, Professor of Christian World Relations, Andover 

Newton Theological School, Newton, Mass. 
Nov. 23. Dr. C. Leslie Glenn, St. John's Church, Washington, D. C. 
Nov. 30. Professor James T. Cleland, Department of Philosophy and Religion, 

Amherst College. 
Dec. 7. Dr. Dilworth Lupton, First Unitarian Church, Cleveland, Ohio. 
Jan. 11. Dr. Herbert J. Gezork, Assistant Professor of Biblical History, 

Wellesley College. 
Jan. 18. Dean Edwin J. van Etten, The Cathedral Church of St. Paul, 

Boston. 
Jan. 25. Rev. Howard Thurman, Howard University, Washington, D. C. 
Feb. 1. Dr. Boynton Merrill, The Second Church, West Newton, Mass. 
Feb. 15. Dr. Paul L. Lehmann, Assistant Professor of Biblical History, 

Wellesley College. 
Feb. 22. Dr. John C. Schroeder, Divinity School, Yale University. 
Mar. 1 . Dr. Henry P. Van Dusen, Union Theological Seminary, New York 

City. 
Mar. 8. Dr. Harold C. PhilUps, The First Baptist Church, Cleveland, Ohio. 
Mar. 15. Dr. Joshua Loth Liebman, Temple Israel, Boston. 
Mar. 22. Professor Julius Seelye Bixler, Divinity School, Harvard University. 
Mar. 29. Dr. Halford E. Luccock, Divinity School, Yale University. 
Apr. 19. Dr. James Gordon Gilkey, South Congregational Church, Spring- 
field, Mass. 
Apr. 26. President Henry S. Coffin, Union Theological Seminary, New York 

City. 
May 3. Dr. Patrick M. Malin, Swarthmore College. 
May 10. Dr. William P. Merrill, Pastor Emeritus, Brick Presbyterian Church, 

New York City. 
May 17. Dr. James Austin Richards, Mount Dora, Florida. 
May 24. Dr. Henry Hallam Tweedy, Professor Emeritus, Divinity School, 

Yale University. 
May 31. Dr. Joseph G. Haroutunian, Presbyterian Theological Seminary, 

Chicago, 111. 
une 7. Professor T. Hayes Procter, Department of Philosophy, Wellesley 

College. 
June 14. Baccalaureate Service. Dean Luther A. Weigle, Divinity School, 

Yale University. 

CONCERTS 

Sept. 24, Oct. 1, and Oct. 8. Faculty Recitals — Richard Burgin, violinist, 

David Barnett, pianist. 
Oct. 16. Helen Traubel. (Concert Fund.) 

Nov. 4. Faculty Recital — Yves Chardon, 'cellist, David Barnett, pianist. 
Nov. 12. Trapp Family Singers. (Concert Fund.) 

47 



Wellesley College 

Dec. 7. Wellesley College Orchestra, assisted by David Barnett, pianist, and 

the Wellesley High School Senior Chorus. 
Jan. 13. Jan Smeterlin, pianist. (Concert Fund.) 
Feb. 10. Joseph Szigeti, violinist. (Concert Fund.) 
Mar. 11. Faculty Recital — Carl Weinrich, organist. 
Mar. 17. Marian Anderson, contralto. (Concert Fund.) 
Apr. 29, May 6, 13, and 20. Student Recitals — Voice, Piano, Organ, Violin, 

and 'Cello. 

In addition to the above, four special musical vesper services were given by the College 
Choir, with Margaret M. Atacdonald as Acting Choir Director and Organist. 



Sept.-Oct. 13. 
Oct. 6-Nov. 7. 

Oct. 11-Dec. 4. 
Oct. 13-Nov. 3. 
Nov. 5-Nov. 24. 



Nov. 

Jan. 

Jan. 
Feb. 

Mar. 
Apr. 
Apr. 

May 

May 



26-Dec. 15. 

9-Jan. 24. 

27-Feb. 16. 
17-Mar. 8. 

14-Apr. 1. 
15-May 6. 
29-May 13. 

9-June 1. 
20-June 2. 



June 8-Sept. 



ART EXHIBITIONS 

Students' work, 1940-41. 

Watercolor copies and photographs of Etruscan tomb 

paintings by Prentice Duell. 
Students' summer work, 1941. 

Work of Paul Klee. Lent by Museum of Modern Art. 
Art and craft of basket making. Exhibition of Indian 

baskets from the museum collection, supplemented by 

loans from Williams College, the Peabody Museum, and 

local collectors. 
Twentieth century paintings. Lent by the Museum of 

Modern Art. 
The Comins Collection of drawings and paintings. Lent 

by Eben F. Comins. 
Watercolors by Agnes A. Abbot. 
Twelve small French paintings. Lent by the Museum of 

Modern Art. 
Paintings and sculpture by the Wellesley Society of Artists. 
Watercolors by Paul Sample. 
Selection of photographs from the National Sculpture 

Society. 
Drawings by Arnold Geissbuhler and Tibor Gergely. 
Prints by Negro artists. Lent by Karamu Settlement 

House, Cleveland, Ohio. 
Students' work, 1941-42. 



CONFERENCES 

Alumnae College, June 16-20. 

Conference for Church Work, June 23-July 2. 

New England Institute of International Relations, June 23-July 3. 

Summer Institute for Social Progress, July 5-19. 

Conference of the Athletic Federation of College Women, April 9-11. 



48 



Appendix 

ACADEMIC STATISTICS OF 1941-42 

Preparation of Entering Class 

Entirely in public high school 187 

Entirely in private school 139 

Partly in public and partly in private schools 76 

402 

Preparatory Schools of Entering Class 

Total number of schools in which preparation was completed . . . 256 

High schools 134 

Private schools 122 

Schools in New England 72 

Schools outside New England 184 

Registration, October, 1941 

Resident candidates for the M.A. degree 28 

Resident candidates for the M.S. degree in Hygiene and Physical 

Education 11 

Resident candidates for the Certificate in Hygiene and Physical 

Education 13 

Candidates for the B.A. degree 1,459 

Seniors 337 

Juniors 342 

Sophomores 367 

Freshmen 413 

Non-candidates for degrees 12 

1,523 
Duplicates 11 

1,512 
New Students in September, 1941 

Freshmen 401 

Sophomores 9 

Juniors 15 

Graduates 20 

Special graduate students 7 

452 
Previous Institutions oj Graduate Students 

Wellesley College 15 

Other women's colleges 16 

Coeducational institutions 18 

Foreign universities 4 

49 



Wellesley College 

Units of Instruction * 

1939-40 1940-41 1941-42 

Art 3,026 3,100 2,795 

Astronomy 543 384 280 

Biblical History 3,162 3,201 3,288 

Botany 1,197 1,322 1,314 

Chemistry 1,465 1,546 1,814 

Economics 2,175 1,721 2,031 

Education 963 858 1,056 

English Composition 3,279 3,559 3,685 

English Literature 3,826 3,631 3,830 

French 3,426 3,236 2,463 

Geology and Geography 1,478 1,533 1,479 

German 1,233 1,091 1,015 

Greek 427 407 322 

History 3,021 3,030 2,925 

Hygiene 770 802 802 

Italian 531 500 263 

Latin 449 389 442 

Mathematics 860 909 1,229 

Musical Theory 1,860 1,800 1,755 

Philosophy 1,321 1,276 1,339 

Physics 586 658 745 

Political Science 966 852 1,062 

Psychology 2,120 2,496 2,336 

Sociology 681 1,170 942 

Spanish 1,038 1,317 1,951 

Speech 1,662 1,691 1,319 

Zoology and Physiology 1,893 1,772 1,901 

Relative Size of Departments 

1939-40 1940-41 1941-42 

Art 5 5 5 

Astronomy 24 27 26 

Biblical History 4 4 3 

Botany 16 14 16 

Chemistry 13 12 11 

Economics 7 10 8 

Education 19 20 19 

English Composition 3 2 2 

English literature 1 1 1 

French 2 3 6 

Geology and Geography 12 13 13 

* A unit of instruction equals the instruction of one student, one hour a week for a 
semester. 

50 



Appendix 



1939-40 1940-41 1941-42 



German 

Greek 

History 

Hygiene 

Italian 

Latin 

Mathematics 

Musical Theory 

Philosophy 

Physics 

Political Science 

Psychology 

Sociology 

Spanish . . 

Speech 

Zoology and Physiology 



Distribution of Major Students by Departments 



Art 

Astronomy 

Biblical History 

Botany 

Chemistry 

Economics 

English Composition 

English Literature 

English Composition and Literature .... 

French 

Geography 

Geology 

German 

Greek 

History 

Hygiene and Physical Education 

Italian 

Latin 

Mathematics 

Musical Theory 

Philosophy 

Physics 

Political Science 

Psychology 

51 



15 




18 


20 


27 




25 


25 


6 




6 


4 


21 




22 


22 


25 




24 


27 


26 




26 


24 


20 




19 


17 


10 




8 


12 


14 




16 


14 


23 




23 


23 


18 




21 


18 


8 




7 


7 


22 




17 


21 


17 




15 


9 


11 




11 


15 


9 

irtme 


■nts 


9 


10 

Graduate 




Seniors 


Students 




25 



8 

6 

35 

17 

34 

41 



22 

1 

1 

3 

1 

27 



2 

3 

12 
8 
3 

7 
34 









1 









3 




5 




2 









8 




1 




1 
























3 




14 




1 


• 







1 




4 









1 




1 




3 



Wellesley College 

Graduate 
Seniors Students 

Sociology 8 

Spanish 6 1 

Zoology and Physiology 18 3 

322 53* 

June Statistics, Class of 1942 

Seniors graduated with Honors in a Special Field 9 

Seniors graduated with Departmental Honors 13 

Bachelor of Arts Degrees 

October, 1941 6 

March, 1942 2 

June, 1942 324 

Total number of B.A. degrees conferred to date 14,036 

Masters'' Degrees and Certificates 
October, 1941 

Master of Science in Hygiene and Physical Education 2 

March, 1942 

Master of Arts 1 

June, 1942 

Master of Arts 18 

Master of Science and Certificate of the Department of Hygiene and 

Physical Education 9 

* 23 carried a full program. 
30 carried a part-time program. 



52 



Appendix 



SCHOLARSHIPS 1941-42 
Undergraduate Scholarships * 





















CO 
6^ 


1 








^8 
•5 in 


•> 


c ^ 

•> 2 


1 


.S § 

> ■£ 


No. 

nts 

ving 


g S 


















Per C 






Rece 
over 


Rece 

$500 


Rece 

$400 


Rece 

$300 


Rece 
Less 


Tota 
Stud 
Rece 




















Amount 


Class 
















of Aid 


1942.. 


...16 


11 


14 


24 


37 


102 


30% 


S 34,342.00 


1943.. 


. 17 


12 


15 


31 


29 


104 


31% 


37,288.00 


1944.. 


. 15 


5 


8 


35 


27 


90 


25% 


30,521.75 


1945.. 


. 16 


1 


6 


16 


33 


72 


17% 


23,756.00 



64 29 43 106 126 368 25% $125,907.75 

Special Refugee Scholarships 

(Full fees for year) 

Class Number of Amount 

Students of Aid 

1942 1 $1,100 

1943 2 2,200 

1944 1^ 1,100 

4 $4,400 

Foreign Student Scholarships 

Number of Amount 

Students of Aid 

Graduate students 4 $2,872 . 80 

Undergraduate students 2 1,823 . 80 

6 $4,696.60 
Graduate Student Scholarships 
(Exclusive of Foreign Students) 

Number of Amount 

Students of Aid 

Scholarships covering tuition plus $100 2 $ 800 

Full or partial tuition scholarships awarded by the 

Committee on Graduate Instruction 12 2,450 

Tuition remitted to members of the staff 25 4,900 

Susanna Whitney Hawkes Teaching Fellowship. ... 1 100 

Amy Morris Homans Scholarship 1 300 

41 $8,550 

* The following statistics include assignments to 1 1 1 students of places in the 

cooperative house, Munger Hall. An assignment to the cooperative house is equal 

in worth to $300 and is considered as much a scholarship award as a money grant. 

53 



Wellesley College 

LEGACIES AND GIFTS 1941-42 
Funds: 

Aldrich Scholarship Fund (additional) (legacy) $ 354 

Wellesley College Associates 2,100 

Alice Cheney Baltzell Fund (additional) (legacy) 3,355 

Lillian Hunt Bermann Fund (additional) (legacy) 229 

Helen R. M. Brady Fund (legacy) 100 

Mary Whiton Calkins Graduate Fund (additional) (legacy). ... 14 

Mary Warren Capen Fund (additional) (legacy) 4,985 

Class of 1885 Alumnae Fund (additional) 500 

Class of 1917 Fund (additional) 2,100* 

Class of 1921 Fund (additional) 570 

Class of 1922 Fund (additional) 576 

Endowment Fund for Salaries (additional) 3,750 

Annette Finnigan Endowment Fund (legacy) (restricted) 25,000 

Founders Fund (additional) 25 

Marguerite Adelaide Godding Scholarships (legacy) (restricted) 3,000 

Sophie Hart Fund (additional) 1,640 

Margaret A. Heath Fund (legacy) 2,300 

Infirmary Building Fund (additional) 50,510 

Eliza H. Kendrick Fund (legacy) 6,041 

Frances L. Knapp Memorial Scholarship Fund 25 

Anne A. Lewis Scholarship Fund (legacy) (restricted) 13,259 

Alice H. Luce Scholarship Fund (additional) (legacy) 482 

Adelaide Spencer Meredith Fund (additional) 494 

Helen A. Merrill Fund (additional) 1,500 

New Jersey Wellesley Club Scholarship Fund (additional) 1,000 

Wellesley College News Fund (restricted) 3,072 

Charles A. Pastene Fund (additional) (restricted) 2,000 

Anna C. Patten Scholarship Fund (additional) (legacy) 18 

Alice F. Peckham Fund (legacy) 1,000 

Pittsburgh Wellesley Club Scholarship Fund (additional) 500 

Lilian E. Pool Fund (additional) (legacy) 5,340 

Science Hill Alumnae Association Scholarship Fund (restricted) 5,867 

Shattuck Scholarship Fund (legacy) (restricted) 5,000 

Anne Lawrence Shepard Fund (restricted) 750 

Anna Margaret and Mary Sloan Scholarship Fund (legacy) 

(restricted) 4,685 

Mayling Soong Foundation 4,163 

Woodrow Wilson Prize Fund (restricted) 200 

* Amount given by the Class of 1917 to bring their accumulated fund to $10,000, 
subsequently transferred to the Mayling Soong Foundation. 



54 



Appendix 

Alumnae Fund Gift — $25,359 

Salary of Mary Whiton Calkins Visiting Professor $ 5,500 

Thomas B. Harbison Memorial Scholarship Fund (additional) . . 2,000 

Florence Annette Wing Memorial Fund for Poetry Prize 1,000 

Frances L. Knapp Memorial Scholarship Fund 920 

Mayling Soong Foundation 1,225 

Infirmary Building Fund (additional) 2,633 

1915 Class Daughters Fund (additional) 475 

Unrestricted gift to be designated by the Trustees 11 ,606 

Gifts: 

To Departments. 
Art. 

From Miss Anne Morton Rhodes, lace, Brussels. 

From Miss E. W. Young and Miss E. Walker, 11 Indian baskets. 

From Mary B. Jenkins, '03, two Attakapa baskets. 

From Miss Alice Walton, from the estate of Dr. George L. Walton, 47 
Egyptian objects including scarabs, amulets, beads, ushabati. 

From Mr. Frederic H. Curtiss, an ivory figurine of Queen Elizabeth; 
five engravings; three etchings; cartoon, "Snow White," by Walt 
Disney; nine ceramics, Alaskan Indian plate, Chinese and Japanese 
vases; one terracotta head, one terracotta lamp. 

From Ina Chipman Smith, '96, three Japanese prints, two monographs 
on Raphael by Julia Cartwright. 

From Miss Mabel R. Keller, two Mexican shawls. 

From Dorothy Samelson Villmont, '16, one Chinese Mandarin coat, one 
Greek vase. 

From Miss Vida D. Scudder, a book entitled, "Collection of the Most 
Remarkable Monuments of the National Museum," published by 
Raphael Gargiulo, four volumes. 

From Mr. Stanley Charles Nott, booklet descriptive of Chinese Jade. 

From Mr. Chao Ming Chen, booklet entitled, "Symbolism in Chinese 
Porcelain Decoration," by the donor. 

From various members of the department and friends, a number of useful 
books, magazines, pamphlets, photographs and illustrated cata- 
logues. 

Astronomy. 

From Leah B. Allen, M.A. '12, a photograph of the late Annie Jump 
Cannon. 

Biblical History. 

From various friends, books for the department library, including a 
number from the library of the father of the late Frances L. Knapp, 
given by her brother, Lewis Knapp. 

55 



Wellesley College 

Botany. 

From Beatrice L. Booth, M.A. '42, for the museum, specimens of petri- 
fied wood from the Ginkgo National Forest, Washington. 
From Mr. F. W. Hunnewell, for the herbarium, 71 seed plants. 
From Professor F. P. Sipe, University of Oregon, for the herbarium, eight 

lichens. 
From Miss Grace E. Howard, for the herbarium, 128 ferns, mosses, 

hepatics, lichens, fungi, algae. 
From Miss Mary A. Willcox, for the library, "British Wild Flowers in 

Relation to Insects," Nature Series, by Sir John Lubbock, London, 

1875. 
From Ruth Elliott, H.P.E. '14, for the Hbrary, "Album Floristico. 

Ministerio de Agricultura, Servico Florestal," with colored plates 

of Brazilian flora, Brazil, 1940. 
From various members of the department and friends, a number of 

books, plants, seeds and herbarium specimens. 

Education. 

From Helen E. Greenwood, '96, a number of books on the teaching of 

English. 
From Mrs. Gamaliel Bradford, a toy theatre with which Mr. Bradford 

played as a child. 
From friends, a number of old textbooks for the department library. 

Geology and Geography. 

From Miss Mary Lanier, for the department library, a file of sixteen 

volumes of the journal, "Economic Geography," January, 1925 

through December, 1940. 
From Estaire Filbert Cummings, '27, a useful collection of ore minerals. 
From Miss Esther Aberdeen, her personal collection of rocks and fossils, 

including rocks from Colorado and Glacier Park, Silurian fossils 

from Illinois, and a number of other specimens from various 

regions. 
From Edith Jones Tower, '16, a first edition of Lyell, "Principles of 

Geology," in two volumes. 

Greek. 

From Miss Katherine M. Edwards, books for the department library. 

Hygiene and Physical Education. 

From the Mary Hemenway Alumnae Association, a portrait photograph 
of Dr. William Skarstrom. 

Mathematics. 

From Mabel M. Young, '98, a set of drawing instruments. 

Physics. 

From Mrs. Edward C. Briggs, a large x-ray machine with various 
accessories. 

56 



Appendix 

Spanish. 

From Miss Alice Huntington Bushee, $25 to be awarded to the student 
or students presenting the best pieces of written work in Spanish. 

Zoology and Physiology. 

From Dr. Seymour L. Farber, a Betz microscope, dated 1896, and a set 

of experimental slides of Trichinella spiralis. 
From the Osborn Zoological Laboratory of Yale University, Vol. XXII 

of "The Contributions from the Osborn Zoological Laboratory." 

To the Library. 
From Friends of the College Library: 

From Mr. and Mrs. Walter S. Tower (Edith Jones, '16), Pliny's 
"Natural History," Venice, Jenson, 1472; Boccaccio's "II Cor- 
baccio," 1487; "Works," of Charles Lamb; Talfourd's "Final 
Memorials of Charles Lamb," 1848. 

From Elizabeth W. Manwaring, '02, first edition of Sir Walter Scott's 
"Lay of the Last Minstrel"; "The Death of Oenone, Akbar's Dream, 
and Other Poems," by Alfred Tennyson; "The Lover and Reader," 
1789; Philip Stanhope, Second Earl of Chesterfield "His Corre- 
spondence with Various Ladies"; Thomas Warton's "Poems on 
Several Occasions," 1748; a collection of autograph letters from 
contemporary poets and writers; one hundred and seventy-four 
volumes, chiefly in contemporary literature, particularly poetry. 

From Mr. and Mrs. Frederic H. Curtiss, "Opera," of Horace, Birming- 
ham, John Baskerville, 1770; first collected edition of Leigh Hunt's 
"Poetical Works"; "Genealogical Dictionary of the First Settlers of 
New England," by James Savage, Boston, 1860-1862; "The Critic," 
by Richard Brinsley Sheridan, rare, spurious first edition with 
watermark dated 1795; Edmund Spenser's "Epithalamion . . . 
drawings by George Wharton Edwards"; "American Engravers 
upon Copper and Steel," by Daniel McNeely Stauffer, Grolier 
Club, 1907; the "Works," of Voltaire; three hundred and forty-one 
volumes selected for their usefulness in various fields of knowledge; 
a large oriental rug for the Brooks Room. 

From Mr. Charles E. Goodspeed, "Sesame and Lilies. Lecture I: Of 
King's Treasuries," by John Ruskin (Proof sheets, 1865); "The 
King of the Golden River," by John Ruskin, Chicago, 1914; "An 
lU-Assorted Marriage, an Unpublished Letter," by John Ruskin; 
"Manuscript Notes on Conversations with George Allen, chiefly 
concerning John Ruskin," by M. Tompkinson; other miscellaneous 
volumes relating to Ruskin and his Circle. 

From Katharine C. Balderston, '16, "The Publishing Firm of Cadell and 
Davies; Select Correspondence and Accounts, 1793-1836," by 
Theodore Besterman. 

From Miss Caroline Hazard, "Color and Light in Painting," by Roland 

57 



^ Wellesley College 

Rood; "Mission Music of California," transcribed and edited by 
Reverend Owen Da Silva. 

From Martha Hale Shackford, '96, six copies of her edition of "Letters 
from Elizabeth Barrett to B. R. Haydon"; "Annals of the English 
Stage from Thomas Betterton to Edmund Kean," by Dr. Doran, 
London, 1886; Broadside (slavery) with two poems; "The Patience 
of Hope," with Whittier's introduction, from his library; "Concise 
System of Grammatical Punctuation," by Benjamin Greenleaf, 
Haverhill, 1822; Pope's "Essay on Man," Portsmouth, N. H., 1809; 
"A Sabbath Scene," by J. G. Whittier, Boston, 1854; and three 
other items. 

From dues and undesignated gifts of money, $407. 

From other sources: 

From Mr. Marvin B. Pool, $410 for the Edith Butler Pool Memorial, for 
books on English Literature. 

From the 2,050 miscellaneous volumes accessioned as gifts of alumnae, 
faculty, and donors in general, the following highly selective exam- 
ples have been chosen to illustrate the wide range of interests that 
have been focused on the Library: 

From Mr. Donald Coney, Librarian of the University of Texas, "A 
Catalogue of the Library of the Late John Henry Wrenn," com- 
piled by Harold B. Wrenn, edited by Thomas J. Wise. Five 
volumes. Limited edition. This gift adds a rare bibliographical 
work not obtainable in any market. 

From Ruth E. Adomeit, '31, a miniature Bible published in Coopers- 
town, 1843. 

From Ann Orr Boswell, '04, seven volumes added to her earlier gift in 
honor of Frances Warren Pershing, '03. 

From Dorothy Braude, '42, thirteen choice books of current interest for 
the Infirmary Library. 

From Ellen Richardson Clapp, '19, the Centennial Edition of "The 
Works and Letters of Sidney Lanier," and Raymond Haven's 
"Mind of the Poet, a Study of Wordsworth's Thought." 

From Margaret L. Hewitt, '97, ten volumes of which the rarest is Ovid's 
"Metamorphosis, Englished ... By G. S. (George Sandys)." 
London, 1640. 

From Mrs. Elisabeth Hodder, fifteen volumes including the Arber Edi- 
tion of the "Works," of Captain John Smith; a "Map of Old Lon- 
don," dated 1865. 

From Dorothy Fletcher Howerth, '22, "Astronomie Physique ou Prin- 
cipes Generaux de la Nature . . . aux Principes de la Philosophic 
de M. Newton," by Etienne Simon Gamaches, Paris, 1740; avail- 
able data on the Children's Bureau Commission on Children in 
Wartime; scripts of the Children's Bureau's "Raising a President" 
radio program; scripts available in the Bureau's radio series, "Chil- 
dren in Wartime." 

58 



Appendix 

From Minnie B. Joy, ex '79, "Solomon's Temple Spiritualized: or, 
Gospel Light Fetched out of the Temple at Jerusalem," by John 
Bunyan, Hartford, 1802; "The Mute Christian under the Smarting 
Rod," by Thomas Brooks, London, 1698; and five other volumes 
including early nineteenth century text books. 

From Anna Brown Lindsay, '83, "Annotations upon all the Books of the 
Old and New Testaments," London, 1657, containing records of the 
Carey Family; "Holy Bible," Philadelphia, 1824; $25 for care and 
repair of her Arthurian Collection, an earlier gift. 

From Lucinda M. Lord, '31, Macaulay's "History of England from the 
Accession of James H"; Gibbon's "Decline and Fall of the Roman 
Empire." 

From Mr. Hamilton C. MacDougall, "The Discovery of the Ancient 
City of Norumbega," by Eben Norton Horsford, presentation copy 
from Mr. Horsford to Mrs. Durant. 

From Maud Mason, ex '91, eight volumes, including Hardy, Barrie, and 
Howells items. 

From Clara More de Morinni, '04, guest book with autographs of 
visitors to Tower Court. 

From Professor and Mrs. James B. Munn (Ruth Hanford, '09), one 
hundred and eighteen volumes chiefly in contemporary litera- 
ture. 

From Frances Jane Partridge, ex '31, "Illinois Historical Collections," 
nineteen volumes; "Transactions of the Illinois Historical Society, 
1908-1935," thirty volumes. 

From Elizabeth B. Peckham, '86, twenty-five volumes of modern 
authors, several early editions of English poets, and some ezirly 
Greek text books. 

From Gertrude A. Pomeroy, ex '97, the issue of "The New York Her- 
ald," containing the announcement of the death of President 
Lincoln; five letters for the collection of original autograph letters 
in the Treasure Room. 

From Miss Vida D. Scudder, memorabilia of Madame Catherine 
Breshkovsky, including one hundred and two autographed letters, 
notes and photographs, together with a collection of newspaper 
clippings; also six issues of Jackson's "Oxford Journal." 

From Miss Edith M. Smaill, a collection of original autograph letters 
written by famous actors and playwrights, 1904-1931. 

From Miss Alice V. Waite, "Bulletin of the Metropolitan Museum of 
Art," 1913-1919, 1925-1930; twenty-four volumes of Baedeker and 
other guides to European travel; five text books; "The Lady's 
Pocket Library," Chambersburg, 1797; "Hoyle's Games," 1838; 
"Beauties of Shakespeare," by William Dodd, Boston, 1827; "The 
Spectator," 1865, in four volumes; "Proceedings of the Vermont 
Historical Society," miscellaneous volumes. 

59 



Wellesley College 

From Ruby Willis, '09, "New England Primer," Hartford, Conn., 1844; 
"My Picture Book"; "The Children in the Wood," Cooperstown, 
1839; "The Mother's Illustrated Primer." 

From Lucy Wilson, '09, "The New England Primer," Worcester, n.d., 
"Psalms, carefully suited to the Christian Worship in the United 
States of America . . . ," N. Y., 1829; "Objections Answered," by 
Alice Stone Blackwell, New York Woman Suffrage Association. 

General. 

From the Class of 1884, a portrait of the late Annie Jump Cannon, famed 
astronomer and member of the Class of 1884, painted by her artist- 
friend, Mrs. William H. Rolfe of Boston. 

From Mrs. George S. Burgess, a portrait of the late Katharine Lee Bates, 
painted by Mary C. Burgess, daughter of the donor. 

From Mrs. Charles B. Perkins, the original sketch by Mr. Charles Wood- 
bury for his portrait of the late Katharine Lee Bates. 

From Mr. and Mrs. Frederic H. Curtiss, an Enneking landscape. 

From Belle Sherwin, '90, a rug designed by a friend. 

From Janet K. Sanford, '36, and Katherine K. Sanford, '37, $1,000 for 
scholarships. 

From a friend of the College, $50 for the best Junior library. 

From Mrs. William Stetson, a woodland scene painted by David M. 
McCord. 

From Miss Olive C. Grigor, an Encyclopedia Britannica and a set of 
Shakespeare for dormitory libraries. 

From Charlotte Jones, '35, an old scrapbook of the College, rebound. 

From various friends of the College, $2,116, including $300 from the 
Thrift Shop, for the President's Fund. 

From Mr. Hill Blackett, $1,000 for the establishment of a campus radio 
station. 

From Friends of the Art Museum, $155. 

From the Committee of the Permanent Charity Fund, Incorporated, 
$1,000 for scholarships. ($500 of this amount was received from 
the income from the Clarence Hollander Fund.) 

From the estate of Lucinda Wyman Prince, '91-'93, the annual gift of 
$500 for scholarships. 

From the Charles Irwin Travelli Fund, $500 for scholarships. 

From various friends of the College, $2,801 for scholarships. 



60 



REPORT OF THE TREASURER 

1941-1942 

To the Trustees of Wellesley College: 

I submit the following report of the financial operation of the college 
for the year ended June 30, 1942. 

John P. Chase, 

Treasurer. 



To the Treasurer: 

Exhibit A, the Comparative Balance Sheet, and Exhibit B, 
the Comparative Statement of Operating Income and Expendi- 
tures, for the years ending June 30, 1941 and June 30, 1942 
follow, together with various pertinent schedules. 

Plant. The new addition to the Simpson Infirmary was 
dedicated, with appropriate exercises, in February, 1942. 
Shortly thereafter the patients were transferred from the old 
section to the new, and the contractors began the remodeling 
operations which will provide excellent quarters for doctors 
and nurses, and various specialty rooms in the old infirmary 
building. 

Funds and Investments. This year the Trust Funds were de- 
creased by the amount of $115,882. The principal reasons for 
this decrease were the expenditure for construction and equip- 
ment of the Infirmary of S222,908 from these funds, and securi- 
ties losses totaling $213,099. 

The chief additions to Trust Funds during the year were: 
Funds income added to principal $58,676, Legacies and Gifts 
of $162,194, and $110,757 added to Reserve Funds. 

Scholarship Funds were increased during the past year by 
$37,000. 

The income realized on invested funds was in excess of 4 
per cent. 

Income and Expenditures. Schedule B, the Comparative State- 
ment of Operating Income and Expenditures for the past two 
years shows a small surplus for each year. Extraordinary 
expenses of the present year included bonus payments of $39,377 
and A.R.P. expenditures of $8,288. 

The Alumnae Association, through the Alumnae Fund, made 
gifts totaling $25,359. The undesignated portion of this gift is 
$11,606. 

A comparison of the two years' expenditures indicates a 
cooperative effort to reduce operating costs. 

Respectfully submitted, 

D. W. Height, 
Assistant Treasurer. 

63 



Wellesley College 



COMPARATIVE 

As AT June 30, 

June 30, 1942 June 30, 1941 

Current 
Working Assets: 

Cash in Banks and on Hand $ 148,077.83 S 173,969.44 

Accounts Receivable $ 5,201 . 27 $ 4,538 . 92 

Inventories: 

Maintenance Supplies and Fuel Oil S 59,437.41 $ 30,756.06 

Dormitory Supplies 48,624.37 31,364.90 

Total Inventories $ 108,061.78 $ 62,120.96 

Unexpired Insurance $ 12,299.60 $ 8,533.00 

Sundry Deferred Items S 16,405.91 $ 11,753.76 

Total $ 290,046.39 $ 260,916.08 

Loan Fund Accounts: 

Cash in Bank $ 7,986.13 $ 6,891.79 

Loans Receivable: 

Mary Hemenway Loan Fund $ 4,872 . 00 I 5,030 . 54 

McDonald-Ellis Loan Fund 100.00 100.00 

Helen A. Shafer Loan Fund 75 . 00 188 . 00 

Student Aid Fund 90.00 160.00 

$ 5,137.00 % 5,478.54 

Total $ 13,123.13 8 12,370.33 

Plant 
Plant at Book Value (Schedule 3): 

Land % 460,705.00 $ 460,705.00 

BuUdings and Fixed Equipment $10,723,540.30 $10,520,016.48 

Less: Amount vsritten off for Depreciation 1,820,651 . 13 1,767,991 . 53 

$ 8,902,889.17 % 8,752,024.95 

Movable Equipment $ 1,889,380.25 $ 1,868,699.80 

Less: Amount written off for Depreciation of 

Equipment in Faculty Houses 18,172.22 17,200.45 

$ 1,871,208.03 $ 1,851,499.35 



Total S 11,234,802.20 $11,064,229.30 



{Carried forward) $11,537,971.72 $11,337,515.71 

64 



Treasurer's Report 



Exhibit A 
BALANCE SHEET 

1942 AND 1941 

Liabilities and Funds 

June 30, 1942 June 30, 1941 

Current 
Current Liabilities: 

Accounts Payable $ 66,109 . 57 $ 70,321 . 78 

Income Deferred: 

Application Fees Prepaid $ 20,960.00 $ 22,955 .00 

Unexpended Gifts for Special Purposes 51,969 . 81 46,725 . 82 

Unexpended Income of Trust Funds (Schedule 4). . . 38,352.03 33,734.57 

Sundry Deferred Items 29,664.86 10,402.96 

$ 140,946.70 S 113,818.35 

Surplus $ 82,990.12 $ 76,775.95 

Total $ 290,046.39 $ 260,916.08 

Loan Fund Accounts: 

Mary Hemenway Loan Fund S 10,554.02 $ 10,151.80 

McDonald-Ellis Loan Fund 495 . 00 455 . 00 

Helen A. Shafer Loan Fund 501 . 93 460 . 43 

Student Aid Fund 551.84 467.75 

Malvina Bennett Loan Fund 835 . 35 835 . 35 

Mary Whiton Calkins Graduate Fund 184. 99 

Total $ 13,123.13 S 12,370.33 

Plant 

Funds Used for Plant and Equipment: 

Permanent Plant Capital S 11,134,802.20 $10,964,229.30 

Plant Capital Subject to Annuity 100,000 . 00 100,000 . 00 



$11,234,802.20 $11,064,229.30 



{Carried forward) $11,537,971.72 $11,337,515.71 

65 



Wellesley College 



COMPARATIVE 

As AT June 30, 
Assets {Continued) 

June 30. 1942 June 30, 1941 

(Brought forward) 811,537,971.72 811,337,515.71 

Trust Funds 
Investment of Trust Funds: 

Cash in Banks $ 121,480.26 $ 182,167.11 

Securities at Book Value (Schedule 6) 

(Approximate market value at June 30, 1942 — 

89,028,395.20) 10,515,672 . 17 10,563,818 . 78 

Premiums paid by Classes of 1917 (1941 only) 1921 

and 1 922 on Endowment Life insurance Policies . . 37,653 . 05 44,704 . 79 
Real Estate 3.00 



Total $10,674,808.48 $10,790,690.68 



Grand Total $22,212,780.20 $22,128,206.39 



66 



Treasurer's Report 

Exhibit A 
{Concluded) 

BALANCE SHEET 

1942 AND 1941 

Liabilities and Funds {Continued) 

June 30. 1942 June 30, 1941 

{Brought Jorward) $11,537,971.72 $11,337,515.71 

Trust Funds 
Permanent Endowment: 

General Funds S 1,571,938.88 S 1,566,952.88 

Special Funds: 

Annuity Funds 372,773.50 386,788.50 

Departmental Funds 218,774.00 206,280.00 

Lecture Funds 56,629.15 30,382.00 

Library Funds 303,876.99 302,460.61 

Maintenance Funds 723,629.00 723,604.00 

Miscellaneous Funds 71,566.44 55,581.86 

Salary Funds 4,706,847.75 4,699,212.89 

Scholarship, Fellowship, Prize and Loan Funds. . . 1,123,980.72 1,078,814.04 

Total Permanent Endowment $ 9,150,016.43 S 9,050,076.78 

Building and Equipment Funds 94,600.68 258,541 .94 

Unallocated Funds 49,689 .91 56,410 . 72 

Funds Unrestricted AS TO Principal AND Income . . 476,863.32 446,193.25 

Accidents Reserve Fund 1 3,724 .83 11,211.55 

Reserve Fund for Depreciation of Buildings. . . . 716,546. 13 638,967. 10 

Securities Income Reserve Fund 80,418.70 33,998.19 

Securities Investment Reserve Fund 76,448 . 48 278,033 . 33 

Accumulated profit from sale of securities not yet 
allocated to Funds 

Trustee Accounts 16,500.00 17,257.82 

Total S10,674,808.48 $10,790,690.68 

Grand Total $22,212,780.20 $22,128,206.39 



REPORT OF AUDITORS 

We have audited the books of the College for the year ended June 30, 1942 and found 
them to be correct. The securities representing the investment of the Trust Funds were 
inspected by us or otherwise satisfactorily accounted for. We report that the foregoing 
balance sheet and the statements annexed are in accordance with the books and that, in 
our opinion, subject to the provisions of the attached report, they show the true state of the 
financial affairs of the College at June 30, 1942 and the results of the year ended that date. 

Barrow, Wade, Guthrie & Co., 

Accountants and Auditors. 
Boston, Massachusetts, 

September 15, 1942. 



67 



Wellesley College 



COMPARATIVE STATEMENT OF 

For Years Ended 
Expenditures 

Year Ended Year Ended 

June 30, 1942 June 30. 1941 

Educational and General: 
Administrative : 

Salaries and Expenses of the President, Treasurer, 
Assistant Treasurer, Comptroller; also of Publica- 
tions, Commencement Exercises and other Ad- 
ministrative Expenses S 154,695.66 $ 142,459.06 

Appropriation for Contribution to Pension and In- 
surance Fund 65,000.00 65,000.00 

8 219,695.66 $ 207,459.06 

Academic: 

Salaries and Expenses of the Department of Instruc- 
tion, Deans, Recorder, Board of Admission and 
Other Expenses of Instruction S 668,767 . 17 $ 645,139 . 02 

Library: 

Salaries, Book Purchases and Other Expenses of the 

Library $ 82,809.27 $ 80,588.04 

Maintenance: 

Repairs and Maintenance of Buildings and Equip- 
ment (except Buildings of Auxiliary Enterprises), 

Insurance, Maintenance of Grounds, etc $ 217,904.91 S 211,652.86 

Appropriation for Depreciation Reserve 48,984.00 108,984.00 

$ 266,888.91 $ 320,636.86 

Annuities: 

Annuities Paid from Endowment and Current Income 20,614.19 $ 21,295.94 

Special Appropriation for Reserve Fund for De- 
preciation $ 10,000.00 $ 

Total Educational and General $1,268,775.20 $1,275,118. 92 

Auxiliary Enterprises 

Dormitories $ 585,473.89 $ 562,739.57 

Simpson Infirmary 37,326 .40 31,619.36 

Faculty Houses 49,390.49 48,693.20 

Page Memorial School 12,768.80 11,664.60 

TheWeU 20,915.70 21,664.81 

Total Auxiliary Enterprises $ 705,875.28 $ 676,381 .54 

Carnegie Foundation Retiring Allowance (Contra) $ 43,860.00 $ 43,126.38 

Surplus of Income for Year $ 6,214.17 $ 3,169.66 

Total Operating Expenditures $2,024,724.65 $1,997,796.50 

Note: In addition to the expenses shown above, ex- 
traordinary repairs met from the Reserve Fund for De- 
preciation of BuUdings amounted to $ 11,298.99 $ 30,290.14 

68 



Treasurer's Report 

Exhibit B 
OPERATING INCOME AND EXPENDITURES 

June 30, 1942 and 1941 

Income 

Year Ended Year Ended 

June 30, 1942 June 30. 1941 
Educational and General: 
Student Fees: 

General Tuition S 799,460 . 31 $ 787,367 . 25 

Deduct: Scholarships 112,084.35 100,277.00 

S 687,375.96 $ 687,090.25 

Music Tuition 6,270 . 85 7,051 . 20 

Other Fees 3,408 . 36 3,669 . 64 

$ 697,055.17 S 697,811.09 

From Endowment: 

Investment Income Allocated to Current Expenses. 

See Schedule 4 for Total Income from Endowment S 345,589.58 $ 343,991.32 

Annuities paid from Endowment Income and Trus- 
tee Accounts 18,673.19 19,075.54 

S 364,262.77 S 363,066.86 

From Gifts S 22,825.20 S 28,548.76 

From Other Sources: 

Application Fees Appropriated $ 12,035.00 $ 11,560.00 

Interest and Rents 14,697.40 16,511.15 

MisceUaneous 6,697.38 6,383.96 

Sale of Property 337.27 873.40 

$ 33,767.05 S 35,328.51 

Total Educational and General 51,117,910.19 51,124,755.22 

AixxiLiARY Enterprises: 

Dormitories S 781,268.19 S 750,431.09 

Simpson Infirmary 6,146.77 4,216.87 

Faculty Houses 44,380.12 43,536.74 

Page Memorial School 10,212.69 10,032.92 

The Well 20,946.69 21,697.28 

Total Auxiliary Enterprises 5 862,954.46 S 829,914.90 

Carnegie Foundation Retiring Allowance (Contra) 5 43,860.00 5 43,126.38 

Total Operating Income 52,024,724 . 65 $1 ,997,796 . 50 



69 



Wellesley College 



Schedule 1 



COMPARATIVE OPERATING STATEMENT OF 
DORMITORIES 

For Years Ended June 30, 1942 and 1941 

Year Ended Year Ended 

June 30. 1942 June 30, 1941 
Dormitories: 
Income: 

Faculty Board S 35,076.77 $35,310.00 

Student Board 729,210 . 94 697,051 . 75 

Sundries 16,980.48 18,069.34 

Total Income $781 ,268 . 1 9 $750,431 . 09 

Expenses: 

Operating Expenses: 

Salaries $ 50,866.04 $ 48,675.85 

Wages 137,481.93 129,486.01 

Provisions 200,593.87 197,294.19 

Laundry 21,134.04 21,846.78 

Heat, Light, Water and Sewer 46,321 . 84 43,578 . 35 

Repairs and Maintenance 77,897 . 28 68,888 . 1 4 

Rents Payable 2,400.00 2,400.00 

Taxes and Insurance 8,343 . 96 8,673 . 71 

Miscellaneous 38,469.48 39,236.37 

Use of Sewers (Campus) 1,965 . 45 2,660. 17 

Total Operating Expenses . . $585,473 . 89 $562,739 . 57 

Net Operating Income — Dormitories $195,794.30 $187,691.52 



Increase 
Decrease 



\ 233.23 

32,159.19 

7,088.86 



$30,837. 


10 


$ 2,190 


19 


7,995 


92 


3,299 


68 


772.74 


2,743 


49 


9,009 


14 


329.75 


766.89 


694.72 


$22,734 


32 


$ 8,102 


78 



Note: 



Included in the 1942 expenses is an amount of $5,476.50, representing bonuses paid. 



70 



Treasurer's Report 

Schedule 2 

ADDITIONS AND IMPROVEMENTS TO PLANT 

For Year Ended June 30, 1 942 
Land: 

Balance at June 30, 1942 and 1941 $ 460,705.00 



Buildings and Fixed Equipment: 

Depreciated Value at June 30, 1941 $8,752,024.95 

Additions during year: 

Simpson Infirmary 203,523 . 82 

$8,955,548.77 
Deduct: Depreciation for year 52,659 . 60 

Depreciated Value at June 30, 1942 $8,902,889 . 17 

Movable Equipment: 

Depreciated Value at June 30, 1941 $1,851,499.35 

Additions during year: 

Equipment for Simpson Infirmary $19,384. 32 

Equipment in Treasurer's Office 164. 15 

$19,548.47 
Adjustment for Equipment charged to Expense in prior 

year 1,131 .98 20,680.45 

$1,872,179.80 
Deduct: Depreciation on Equipment in Faculty Houses for year 971 .77 

Depreciated Value at June 30, 1942 $1,871,208.03 

Summary of Expenditures During Year for Additions and Improve- 
ments: 

Buildings and Fixed Equipment S 203,523 . 82 

Movable Equipment 19,548 . 47 

$ 223,072.29 
The Foregoing Additions and Improvements Were Provided for as 
Follows: 

From Trust Funds available for these purposes 222,908 . 14 

From Current Funds permanendy transferred to Plant Capital 164. 15 

$ 223,072.29 



71 



Wellesley College 



SCHEDULE OF PLANT 



Schedule 3 



June 30, 1942 

(a) Land 

Book Value 

Central Street 22 acres, 24,820 sq. ft $ 20,000.00 

Norfolk Terrace: 

Crofton 5,400 sq. ft 900.00 

Ridgeway 14,392 sq. ft 2,238.00 

Webster 4,800 sq. ft 800.00 

Corner lot at Weston Road 4,800 sq. ft 800 . 00 

Washington Street: 

Campus 215 acres 263,892.00 

Corner lot at Dover Road 1 34 acres 108,500 . 00 

Eliot 41,000 sq. ft 8,300.00 

Horton, Hallowell and Shepard 3 acres, 18,295 sq. ft 9,325.00 

Little 37,592 sq. ft 10,500 . 00 

Noanett 17,275 sq. ft 3,450.00 

Washington 30,244 sq. ft 7,000.00 

Weston Road 58 acres, 10,890 sq. ft 25,000.00 

Total Land 8460,705 . 00 



72 



Treasurer's Report 

Schedule 3 
{Continued) 

SCHEDULE OF PLANT 

June 30, 1942 

(6) Buildings and Fixed Equipment 

Book Value 

Academic Buildings: 

Art S 115,713.35 

Billings Hall 29,370.00 

Chapel 111,832.00 

Founders Hall 450,938 .12 

Geology 51,870.70 

Hetty H. R. Green Hall 1,336,667.92 

Mary Hemenway Hall 121,154.45 

Library 242,490 . 36 

Music Hall 34,100 . 00 

Page Memorial School including Nursery School. . . . 36,875. 19 

Observatory 52,392 . 08 

Pendleton Hall 81 5,868 . 40 

Recreation Building 409,336 . 80 

Sage Hall and Greenhouse 1,293,608 . 44 

$ 5,102,217.81 
Dormitories: 

Beebe S 120,063 . 22 

Cazenove 208,337 . 63 

Claflin 263,707 . 65 

Crofton 9,346 . 46 

Dower and Annex 60,000 . 00 

Eliot 35,759 . 51 

Fiske 25,925 . 68 

Homestead 50,676 . 89 

Lake 55,446 . 81 

Little 8,500.00 

Munger 322,115.88 

Noanett 37,056 . 79 

Norumbega 54,200 . 00 

Pomeroy 208,379 . 67 

Severance 594,91 5 . 80 

Shafer 117,950.40 

Stone— Olive Davis 772,013.23 

Tower Court 526,271 . 45 

Washington 24,000 . 00 

Washington Annex 4,000 . 00 

3,498,667.07 
{Carried forward) $ 8,600,884 . 88 



73 



Wellesley College 



Schedule 3 
(Continued) 



SCHEDULE OF PLANT 

June 30, 1942 
{b) Buildings and Fixed Equipment {Continued) 



Book Value 



{Brought forward) 

Dwellings and Garages: 

Crawford 

Dover Road House 

Dower Garage 

East Lodge 

Grounds Cottage 

Little House Annex 

Oakwoods 

Observatory House 

President's House 

President's House Garage 

Ridgeway 

Waban House 

Waban Barn 

Webber Cottage 

Webster 

West Lodge 

Weston Road— No. 158 

Faculty Houses: 

Garage 

Hallowell 

Horton 

Shepard 

Miscellaneous : 

Alumnae Hall 

Boat House 

Golf Club House 

Hay Outdoor Theatre 

Simpson Infirmary 

Simpson Infirmary — Gray House . 

Simpson Infirmary — Garage 

Skiff House 

{Carried forward) 



$ 8,600,884.88 



6,400 . 00 

2,905.00 

600 . 00 

8,831.38 

10,233.79 

6,000.00 

25,317.95 

11,913.30 

44,487.33 

3,438.88 

30,325.07 

7,925.00 

1,325.00 

2,000 . 00 

7,281.79 

4,200 . 00 

5,004.15 



6,222.77 

66,959.32 

100,438.98 

77,643.00 



446,573.87 

3,000.00 

800.00 

12,326.64 

247,200.38 

1,840.00 

659.21 

500.00 



178,188.64 



251,264.07 



712,900.10 



$ 9,743,237.69 



74 



Treasurer's Report 

Schedule 3 
{Continued) 

SCHEDULE OF PLANT 

June 30, 1942 
{b) Buildings and Fixed Equipment {Continued) 

Book Value 



{Brought forward) S 9,743,237 . 69 

Service Buildings: 

Grounds Service Building $ 13,804. 21 

Mason's Shed 879 . 1 1 

Oil House 2,776.86 

Power House 125,720 . 94 

Service Building 44,907 . 43 

Sewerage Building 500 . 00 

Storage Sheds 3,238. 12 

Tool House 2,426 . 00 



194,252.67 

Total Buildings $ 9,937,490. 36 

Fixed Equipment 786,049 . 94 



Total Buildings and Fixed Equipment. . $10,723,540 . 30 

Deduct: Depreciation written off 1,820,651 .13 



Depreciated Value $ 8,902,889 . 17 



75 



Wellesley College 

Schedule 3 
{Concluded) 

SCHEDULE OF PLANT 

June 30, 1942 

(c) Movable Equipment 

Book Value 

Alumnae Hall $ 26,360.09 

Boston Office 697 . 78 

Chapel 31,203 . 51 

Crawford 1,813.93 

Departments of Instruction and Administration 1,380,297.95 

Dormitories 331,271 . 12 

East Lodge 545 . 50 

Grounds 25,896 . 49 

Hallowell House 864.07 

Horton House 16,763 . 97 

Oakwoods 4,940 . 50 

Observatory House 1,669 . 43 

Orchard 225 .00 

President's House 19,793.71 

Ridgeway 424 . 88 

Service Building 17,086 . 20 

Shepard House 1,807 . 56 

Simpson Infirmary 27,642 . 81 

Webster 75.75 

$1,889,380.25 
Deduct: Depreciation on Equipment in Faculty Houses. . 18,172 . 22 

Total Movable Equipment S 1,871,208.03 



Summary 

(a) Land S 460,705 . 00 

(b) Buildings and Fixed Equipment at Depreciated 

Value 8,902,889 . 17 

(c) Movable Equipment at Depreciated Value 1,871,208.03 



Total Plant, as per Exhibit A $1 1,234,802 . 20 



76 






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77 



Wellesley College 



Schedule 5 

LIST OF TRUST FUNDS SHOWING PRINCIPAL AND 
UNEXPENDED INCOME 

At June 30, 1942 

Unexpended 
Principal Income 

June 30, 1942 June 30, 1942 

Permanent Endowment Funds 
Funds for General Purposes: 

Alumnae General Endowment Fund $ 148,005 . 00 

Mary Warren Capen Fund 5,485 . 00 

Carnegie Corporation Fund 75,000 . 00 

Francis A. Foster Fund 563,400 . 00 

General Endowment Fund 174,600 . 00 

Kate I. Lord Fund 1,100.00 

David Prouty Fund 6,000 . 00 

Helen J. Sanborn Alumnae Endowment Fund 11,200.00 $ 384. 12 

Julia Bone Shepard Fund 42,749 . 50 

Jessie Goff Talcott Fund 543,399 . 38 

Alice Gager Thomas Fund 1,000 . 00 

8 1,571,938.88 $ 384.12 

Funds for Special Purposes: 
Annuity Funds: 

Anonymous Fund No. 1 

Anonymous Fund No. 2 

Anonymous Salary Fund 

Mary S. Case Fund 

Mary Chamberlain Art Fund 

Marjorie Day Fund 

Helen A. Merrill Fund 

Nellie G. Prescott Fund 

Cyrus and Eugenia Stewart Fund 



Departmental Funds: 

Art Department Endowment Fund 

Art Museum Fund 

Avery Fund (Art, Bible, French, Italian, Music) . . , 

Katie Emma Baldwin Fund (Mathematics) 

Robert Charles Billings Fund (Botany) 

Margery and Dorothy Borg Fund (Social Hygiene) . 

Charlotte A. Bragg Fund (Chemistry) 

Alfred Clifford Fund (Science) 

Annie Godfrey Dewey Fund (Zoology) 

Elizabeth E. Downs Fund (Botany) 

Elizabeth F. Fisher Fund (Geology) 

Miriam Iszard Guest Fund (Botany) 

Julia Josephine Irvine (Greek) 

Sarah R. Mann Botany Fund , 

Adelaide Spencer Meredith Fund (Italian) 

Niles Memorial Fund (Geology) 

{Carried forward) 

78 



$ 149,500.00 




75,000.00 




100,000.00 




500.00 




4,000.00 




5,173.50 




7,500.00 




1,000.00 




30,100.00 




$ 372,773.50 


$ 


$ 65,650.00 


$ 


1,500.00 


490.41 


2,500.00 


162.26 


5,600.00 


377.83 


5,800.00 




5,000.00 




1,023.00 


43.22 


10,000.00 


1,691.12 


2,000.00 


432.20 


6,000.00 


385.52 


10,000.00 


400.00 


1,000.00 




5,800.00 




2,000.00 


56i.i3 


1,494.00 


130.00 


1,600.00 




$ 126,967.00 


8 4,613.69 



Treasurer's Report 

Schedule 5 
{Continued) 

LIST OF TRUST FUNDS SHOWING PRINCIPAL AND 
UNEXPENDED INCOME 

At June 30, 1942 

Unexpended 
Principal Income 

June 30, 1942 June 30. 1942 

Permanent Endowment Funds {Continued) 
Funds for Special Purposes: {Continued) 

Departmental Funds: {Continued) {Brought forward) $ 126,967.00 5 4,613.69 

Charles A. Pastene Fund 5,000 . 00 247 . 21 

Rosa Conrad Sanders Fund (Art) 200 .00 49 . 69 

Edmund Clark Sanford Fund (Psychology) 4,182.00 1,443.38 

Scientific Fund 289 . 55 

Isabella Shaw Fund (History) 11,200.00 

Caroline B. Thompson Fund (Zoology) 25,000.00 2,989. 14 

Edith S. Tufts Fund (Latin, Greek) 16,000.00 

Wenckebach Memorial Fund (German) 1,125.00 15.73 

Louise Curtis Whitcomb Fund (French) 1 ,000 .00 85.91 

Sarah E. Whitin Fund (Astronomy) 28,100.00 9,614.35 



S 218,774.00 $19,348.15 



Graduate Fellowship and Scholarship Funds: 

Anne Louise Barret Fund $ 25,000.00 $ 1,000.00 

Loretto Fish Carney Memorial Scholarship 3,750.00 600.00 

Graduate Study and Research Fund 3,000 .00 

Amy Morris Homans Scholarship Fund 7,500.00 

Alice Freeman Palmer Fellowship Fund 35,059 .23 147 . 25 

Fanny Bullock Workman Scholarship Fund 30,000 .00 



$ 104,309.23 $ 1,747.25 



Lecture Funds: 

Katharine Lee Bates Poetry Fund . . 
Annette Finnigan Endowment Fund . 

Helen Kate Furness Fund 

Sophie Hart Fund 

Mary E. Horton Fund 

Physics Lecture Fund 

Elizabeth White Memorial Fund . . . 



11,200.00 $ 159.02 


25,000.00 


291.66 


2,300.00 


183.36 


9,753.65 


664.15 


1,660.00 


265.15 


1,655.50 


91.88 


5,060.00 


742.51 



$ 56,629.15 S 2,397.73 



Library Funds: 

Gorham D. Abbott Memorial Fund (Education) $ 1,100.00 $ 

Blanche G. Bunting Fund (Music) 1 ,000 .00 

Class of 1918 Fund (Music) 5,230.00 

Caroline Dayton Fund (History) 8,100.00 

Dorothea Dean Fund (Music) 5,000.00 

Edith Hemenway Eustis Library Fund (Hygiene) . . . 2,200 .00 36 . 94 

Florence Foley Fund 5,000 .00 

Eleanor A. McC. Gamble Fund (Psychology) 768.71 

Indian Library Fund 2,000 .00 

Arlene Westwood Jackson Fund (French) 2,500.00 

Sophie Jewett Memorial Fund (English Literature) . . 2,1 10 . 55 

Edward N. Kirk Library Fund 6,700.00 231 .09 

Library Permanent Fund 187,737 .50 

Susan Minns Fund (Botany) 11,562.23 531 .05 



{Carried forward) $ 241,008 . 99 $ 799 . 08 

79 



Wellesley College 



Schedule 5 
(Continued) 



LIST OF TRUST FUNDS SHOWING PRINCIPAL AND 

UNEXPENDED INCOME 

At June 30, 1942 

Unexpended 

Principal Income 

June 30, 1942 June 30, 1942 

Permanent Endowment Funds {Continued) 
Funds for Special Purposes: {Continued) 

Library Funds: {Continued) {Brought Jorward) $ 241,008.99 % 799.08 

Annie Hooker Morse Fund 1,100.00 3.36 

Elisabeth Nash Fund (English Literature) 5,000.00 110.65 

George Herbert Palmer Fund 15,000.00 62.33 

Elizabeth Winslow Peters Fund 5,300 .00 

Caroline Frances Pierce Fund 500 .00 

Helen J. Sanborn Spanish Library Fund 5,600. 00 

Seven Women's Colleges Fund 970 .00 

Shafer Library Fund (Mathematics) 2,590 . 00 84 . 90 

Harriet A. Shaw Fund (Music) 20,000 . 00 1,295 . 28 

Sweet Library Fund (Bibhcal History) 5,600 .00 

Marie Louise Tuck Memorial Fund (English Litera- 
ture) 208 . 00 

Helen L. Webster Memorial Fund 1,000.00 



$ 303,876.99 S 2,355.60 



Loan Funds: 

Mary Whiton Calkins Graduate Fund $ 4,630 . 84 

Mary Hemenway Loan Fund 8,500 . 00 

McDonald-Ellis Memorial Fund 1,000 . 00 

Helen A. Shafer Loan Fund 1,000.00 



15,130.84 $ 



Maintenance Funds: 

Alexandra Botanic Garden Fund $ 31,405 .00 $ 55 . 60 

Alumnae Hall Endowment Fund 119,651 .00 

Fiske Hall Fund 1,600.00 710.71 

Founders Fund 190,823.00 

H. H. Hunnewell Aboretum Fund 27,500.00 114.11 

Maintenance Fund for Academic Buildings 322,300 .00 

Organ Fund 2,200. 00 

Amos W. Stetson Fund 4,500.00 691 .06 

Mabel A. Stone Memorial Fund 4,000 . 00 603 . 99 

Three Sisters Choir Fund 16,700.00 

George William Towle Infirmary Fund 2,950.00 



S 723,629.00 $ 2,175.47 



Miscellaneous Funds: 

Lucy Branch Allen Fund $ 500. 00 $ 

Caswell Fund 1,950.98 

Classof 1885 Alumnae Fund 4,978.69 

Sophia Helen Fisk Fund 890.00 309.96 

HorsfordFund 21,978.14 1,100.00 

Eliza Mills McClung Fund 5,280.13 649.22 

Philadelphia Fund 10,000.00 747 . 34 

Mayling Soong (Madame Chiang Kai-shek) Foun- 
dation) 15,388 .50 

L N. Van Nuys Memorial Fund 10,600 . 00 489 . 21 



8 71,566.44 $ 3,295.73 
80 



Treasurer's Report 

Schedule 5 
{Continued) 

LIST OF TRUST FUNDS SHOWING PRINCIPAL AND 

UNEXPENDED INCOME 

At June 30, 1942 

Unexpended 
Principal Income 

June 30. 1942 June 30. 1942 

Permanent Endowthent Funds {Continued) 
Funds for Special Purposes: {Continued) 
Prize Funds: 

Robert Charles Billings Prize Fund (Music) S 3,100.00 $ 476.24 

Katharine Coman Memorial Fund (Economic His- 
tory) 650.00 67.53 

Davenport Prize Fund (Oral Interpretation) 1,100.00 135.95 

Erasmus History Prize Fund 500 . 00 5.91 

Isabelle Eastman Fisk Prize Fund (Public Speaking or 

Debating) 1,100.00 159.31 

Mary G. Hiliman Award (Mathematics) 1,250.00 30.68 

Jacqueline Award (English Composition) 1,020.00 7.50 

Mary White Peterson Prize Fund (Botany, Chemistry, 

Zoology) 1,100.00 61.35 

Anne Lawrence Shepard Fund 750 .00 

Lewis Atterbury Stimson Prize (Mathematics) 3,100.00 16.91 

Ethel H. Folger Williams Memorial Fund (German) 500.00 24.44 

Woodrow Wilson Prize Fund (Political Science) 200.00 .84 

Florence Annette Wing Memorial Fund for Poetry 

Prize 1,000.00 

Natalie Wipplinger Fund (German) 829.43 

$ 16,199.43 $ 986.66 

Salary Funds: 

Katharine Lee Bates Professorship (English Litera- 
ture) S 100,000.00 

Robert Charles Billings Fund (Music) 28,100.00 

Mary Whiton Calkins Professorship 100,980. 36 

Class of 1898 Professorship (Physics) 75,000.00 

Class of 1902 Professorship (English Composition). . . 25,844.00 

Class of 1914 Professorship (English Literature) 50,445. 50 

Katharine Coman Professorship (Industrial History) 50,000.00 

Currier- Monroe Fund (Speech) 30,000.00 

Ralph Emerson Fund (History and Government). . . 35,000.00 

Endowment Fund for Salaries 1,759,403.78 

Ruby Frances Howe Farwell Professorship (Botany). 103,600.00 

Margaret C. Ferguson Professorship (Botany) 45,000 . 00 

Frisbie Professorship (Economics) 19,100.00 

Helen Day Gould Professorship (Mathematics) 56,300.00 

Stephen Greene Professorship of Economics 33,125 .00 

Susan M. Hallowell Professorship (Botany) 40,000.00 

Edward S. Harkness Fund 175,000.00 

Sophie Chantal Hart Professorship (English Composi- 
tion) 100,000.00 

Caroline Hazard Professorship (Music) 103,200.00 

Mary Hemenway Fund (Hygiene) 120,762.00 

A. Barton Hepburn Professorship (Economics) 138,500.00 

Ruth Sibley Hilton Foundation (Music) 25,000 . 00 

The Elisabeth Hodder Professorship of History 50,015.00 

Horsford Fund for Sabbatical Grants 10,500.00 

H. H. Hunnewell Professorship (Botany) 38,100.00 

Ellen Stebbins James Fund 112,600.00 

Elizabeth Kimball Kendall Professorship (History and 

Political Science) 75,000.00 

Ellen A. Kendall Professorship (Greek) 67,600.00 

{Carried forward) $ 3,568,175.64 $ 

81 



Wellesley College 

Schedule 5 
{Continued) 

LIST OF TRUST FUNDS SHOWING PRINCIPAL AND 

UNEXPENDED INCOME 

At June 30, 1942 

Unexpended 
Principal Income 

June 30, 1942 June 30. 1942 

Permanent Endowment Funds {Continued) 

Funds for Special Purposes: {Continued) 

Salary Funds: {Continued) {Brought forward) % 3,568,175.64 

John Stewart Kennedy Fund (Biblical History) 56,300.00 

Clara Bertram Kimball Professorship (Art) 84,500.00 

Hamilton C. Macdougall Professorship (Music) 60,560.00 

Annie S. Montague Fund (Greek) 34,819.07 

Alice Freeman Palmer Memorial Fund (Presidency). 113,800.00 

Alice Freeman Palmer Professorship (History) 80,950.00 

Ellen Fitz Pendleton Fund (Sabbatical Grants) 109,350.00 

Ruth Baker Pratt Professorship (Government) 25,000.00 

Charlotte Fitch Roberts Professorship (Chemistry). . 100,000.00 

Helen J. Sanborn Endowment Fund (Spanish) 132,600.00 

Lewis Atterbury Stimson Professorship (Mathematics) 100,000 . 00 

Carla Wenckebach Professorship (German) 61,400.00 

Candace Wheeler Fund (Sabbatical Grants) 100,000.00 

Sarah Frances Whiting Professorship (Physics) 79,393.04 

$ 4,706,847.75 $ 



Scholarship Funds: 

Adams Scholarship Fund $ 2,200.00 

Aldrich Scholarship Fund 1,004. 43 

Edith Baker Scholarship 7,800.00 

Walter Baker Memorial Scholarship 7,800.00 

Emilie Jones Barker Scholarship 6,082 .82 $ 80 . 44 

Dr. Alma Emerson Beale Fund 3,300 . 00 

LiUian Hunt Bermann Scholarship 5,550.00 

Lucile Kroger Berne Scholarship Fund 10,000 .00 

Charles Bill Scholarship Fund 7,800 .00 

Charles B. Botsford Scholarship Fund 5,600 .00 

Marian Kinney Brookings Scholarship Fund 5,000 .00 

Florence N. Brown Memorial Scholarship 5,600.00 

Emily Grace Bull Scholarship 20,000.00 

Arthur L. Cams Fund 10,000 .00 

Mary Caswell Memorial Scholarship 5,404. 50 

Chicago Wellesley Club Scholarship Fund 5,000.00 

Cincinnati Wellesley Club Scholarship Fund 461 .92 

Augustus R. Clark Memorial Scholarship 5,600.00 

Classof 1880 Scholarship 2,230.33 

Classof 1884 Scholarship Fund 8,645.00 

Classof 1889 Memorial Scholarship 1,100.00 

Class of 1893 Memorial Scholarship Fund 6,100.00 

Class of 1916 Scholarship Fund 2,000.00 

Abbie A. Coburn Memorial Scholarship 2,200.00 

Connecticut Scholarship 5,600 .00 

Margaret McClung Cowan Fund 1,100 .00 

Elizabeth and Susan Cushman Fund 23,610 . 00 

{Carried forward) S 166,789.00 S 80.44 

82 



Treasurer's Report 

Schedule 5 
{Continued) 

LIST OF TRUST FUNDS SHOWING PRINCIPAL AND 

UNEXPENDED INCOME 

At June 30, 1942 

Unexpended 

Principal Income 

June 30, 1942 June 30, 1942 

Permanent Endowment Funds {Continued) 
Funds for Special Purposes: {Continued) 

Scholarship Funds: (Con/?nM(?£/) {Brought forward) S 166,789.00 S 80.44 

George H. Davenport Scholarship 10,000 .00 

Norma I.ieberman Decker Scholarship Fund 6,487 .50 

Durant Memorial Scholarship 5,600.00 

Pauline A. Durant Scholarship 8,250 .00 

John Dwight Memorial Scholarship 10,000.00 

Gertrude Ellis Scholarships 10,000 .00 

Emmelar Scholarship 5,600 .00 

Ruby Frances Howe Farwell Scholarship 2,100 . 00 

Elizabeth S. Fiske Scholarship 5,600 .00 

Joseph N. Fiske Memorial Scholarship 9,000.00 

Rufus S. Frost Scholarships 6,700 .00 

Howard Cogswell Furman Scholarship 5,000 .00 

Mary Elizabeth Gere Scholarship Fund 5,600.00 

Josephine Keene Gifford Scholarship 2,000 .00 

Marguerite Adelaide Godding Scholarships 3,000 .00 

Goodwin Scholarship 5,600 .00 

Helen Day Gould Scholarship No. 1 1 1,200. 00 

Helen Day Gould Scholarship No. 2 11 ,200 .00 

Helen Day Gould Scholarship No. 3 11,200.00 

M. Elizabeth Gray Scholarships 11 ,200 .00 

Grover Scholarships 5,600 .00 

Amelia A. Hall Scholarship Fund 10,000.00 

Sarah Evelyn Hall Scholarship Fund 5,000.00 

Thomas B. Harbison Memorial Scholarship 13,000.00 

Cora Stickney Harper Fund 2,200 .00 

Emily P. Hidden Scholarship Fund 2,200 .00 

Winifred Frances Hill Scholarship 20,000 .00 

Sarah J. Holbrook Scholarship 3,300 .00 

Evelyn and Mary Elizabeth Holmes Scholarship Fund 6,000 .00 

Sarah J. Houghton Memorial Scholarship 6,700.00 

Ada L. Howard Scholarship 6,700 .00 

John R. Hunt Memorial Schoalrship 5,550 .00 

Sarah V. Hunt Memorial Scholarship 5,550.00 

Sarah B. Hyde Scholarship 2,200 .00 

John and Jane Jackson Fund 1 ,878 .78 

Eliza C. Jewett Scholarships 6,700. 00 

Margaret Weyerhaeuser Jewett Fund 5,337 .50 

Sophie Jewett Memorial Scholarship 1,100.00 

Mildred Keim Fund 11,200.00 

Frances L. Knapp Memorial Scholarship Fund 945.00 

Katharine Knapp Scholarship 5,600.00 

Leona Lebus Scholarship Fund 4,000.00 

Anne A. Lewis Scholarship 1 3,259 .73 

Vinnietta June Libbey Scholarship 4,000 .00 

Agnes M. Lindsay Fund 25,000 . 00 400 . 00 

Alice H. Luce Scholarship Fund 5,383 .41 

McDonald-Ellis Gift Scholarship Fund 10,000 .00 

Janet C. Moore Fund 2,000 .00 

Gertrude C. Munger Scholarships 10,587.50 

{Carried forward) % 513,118.42 S 480.44 

83 



Wellesley College 

Schedule 5 
{Continued) 

LIST OF TRUST FUNDS SHOWING PRINCIPAL AND 

UNEXPENDED INCOME 

At June 30, 1942 

Unexpended 

Principal Income 

June 30, 1942 June 30, 1942 

Permanent Endowment Funds {Continued) 

Funds for Special Purposes: {Continued) 

Scholarship 'Funds: {Continued) {Brought Jorward) $ 513,118.42 % 480.44 

New Jersey Wellesley Club Scholarship Fund 2,500 .00 

Adelaide M. Newman Fund 3,000.00 

Anna S. Newman Memorial Scholarship 2,100.00 

New York Wellesley Club Scholarship Fund 6,225 .00 

Northfield Seminary Scholarship 5,600 .00 

Anna Palen Scholarship 1 1,200 .00 

Anna C. Patten Scholarship Fund 10,524. 58 

Mary Arnold Petrie Scholarship 5,000.00 

Adelaide L. Pierce Scholarship Fund 15,000 .00 

Eleanor Pillsbury Memorial Scholarship Fund 106,500 .00 

Pittsburgh Wellesley Club Scholarship 6,900 .00 6 . 67 

Catherine Ayer Ransom Scholarship 1,100.00 

Mae Rice Memorial Scholarship Fund 1,100.00 

Samuel M. and Anna M. Richardson Fund 1 02,61 9 . 70 869 . 1 6 

Rollins Scholarship 9,000.00 

Helen J. Sanborn Alumnae Scholarship Fund 11,200.00 

Science Hill Alumnae Association Scholarships Fund 5,867. 62 

Oliver N., Mary C, and Mary Shannon Fund 18,550.00 

Shattuck Scholarship Fund 5,000. 00 

Anna Margaret and Mary Sloan Scholarship Fund. . 4,685 .90 

David B., Mary B., and Jeannette Cole Smith Memo- 
rial Fund 1,000.00 

Harriet F. Smith Scholarship Fund 22,500 .00 

Mary Frazer Smith Scholarship 1,000 .00 

Stockwell Memorial Scholarship 2,200 .00 

Stone Scholarship Fund 28,100. 00 

Sweatman Scholarship 5,600.00 

Julia Ball Thayer Scholarship 6,700. 00 

Jane Topliff Memorial Scholarship 6,700. 00 

Ann Morton Towle Memorial Scholarship 5,600. 00 

George William Towle Memorial Scholarship Fund . . 7,550 . 00 

Marie Louise Tuck Scholarship Fund 11,200.00 

Union Church Scholarship 2,800. 00 

Weston Scholarship 5,600.00 

Jeannie L. White Scholarship 5,600.00 

Amasa J. Whiting Scholarship 2,600 .00 

Annie M. Wood Scholarship 11,200.00 

Caroline A. Wood Scholarship 5,600.00 

Warren Mead Wright Scholarship Fund 10,000 .00 

$ 988,341.22 $ 1,356.27 



Total Permanent Endowment Funds $ 9,150,016.43 S34,046.98 



84 



Treasurer's Report 

Schedule 5 
[Concluded) 

LIST OF TRUST FUNDS SHOWING PRINCIPAL AND 

UNEXPENDED INCOME 

At June 30, 1942 

Unexpended 

Principal Income 

June 30, 1942 June 30. 1942 
Other Funds 
Building and Equipment Funds: 

Art Building Fund S 1,000.00 S 80.00 

Infirmary Building Fund 85,222 .48 

Emily Grace Bull Morse Fund 8,378.20 

$ 94,600.68 S 80.00 



Unallocated Funds: 

Classof 1921 Fund $ 23,773.31 

Class of 1922 Fund 18,153.89 

Classof 1927 Fund 7,762.71 



S 49,689.91 $ 



Funds Unrestricted as to Principal and Income: 
General : 

Lillian Hunt Bermann Fund $ 15,582 . 40 

William Blodget Fund 5,000 . 00 

Helen R. M. Brady Fund 100.00 

Isabella Campbell Fund 2,500.00 

Angle Clara Chapin Fund 16,268.75 

Jennie M. Deyo Fund 1 ,427 . 25 

Charles Church Drew Fund 65,41 5 . 00 

Amelia G. Dyer Fund 23,450 . 00 

Charlotte M. Fisk Fund 18,950.00 

Margaret A. Heath Fund 2,300.00 

Margaret H. Jackson Fund 1 2,425 . 92 

The Eliza H. Kendrick Fund 6,041 . 34 

John Wells Morss Fund 5,000.00 

Alice F. Peckham Fund 1,000.00 

Lillian E. Pool Fund 5,554.09 

Gladys Brown RolHns Fund 1 ,000 . 00 $ 590 . 00 

Margaret Olivia Sage Fund 141 . 64 

Mary E. Shoemaker Fund 1,100.00 593.70 

Alma Wright Stone Fund 25,000. 00 

Richard H. Sturtevant Fund 1,100.00 

Cornelia Warren Fund 2,500.00 S 211,856.39 

Special: 

Alice Cheney Baltzell Fund $228,308 . 22 

Barnswallows Fund 7,098 . 59 

Biblical History Fund 1,000.00 85.00 

Susanna Whitney Hawkes Fund 1 5,500 . 00 2,956 . 35 

Wellesley College News Fund 3,100 .12 

Sarah Frances Whiting Fund 10,000.00 265,006.93 

$ 476,863.32 $ 4,225.05 



AccroENTs Reserve Fund $ 13,724.83 _$_ 

Reserve Fund for Depreciation of Buildings % 716,546.13 % 

Securities Income Reserve Fund $ 80,418 . 70 % 

SEcuRtriES Investment Reserve Fund $ 76,448 . 48 $ 

Trustee Accounts: 

Class of 1926 Fund $ 6,500.00 

Marjorie Day Trust Fund 10,000 . 00 



$ 16,500.00 $ 



Total Other Funds S 1,524,792.05 $ 4,305.05 

Total of all Funds $10,674,808.48 $38,352.03 

85 



I 



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